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olly

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 109 total)
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  • in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355475

    olly
    Participant

     One more idea about temporary adhesiveness of sewellia eggs. The egg ability to glue may prove to be a method for the spreading to new river and for trip by air on legs and feathers of aquatic birds (or insects) to new locations. That may be a cause of appearance of fish in remote region. Such method of migration by air on birds is known in the case of Pungitius platygaster aralehsis. It is likely our hillstream loaches, being in eggs, enjoy such air trips, and later we consider the fishes of one species that were found in distant locations as different species.

    Just a guess.

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355474

    olly
    Participant

    Thank you for very interesting facts Charles.

    Are such quantity of eggs from one S.lineolata female or from a group (how many?) in this paper? What is the size of S.lineolata female and how many eggs do female release during the one spawning? It is interesting to compare. I didn’t see the new spawnings in my group of S.marmorata for 1,5 months.

    Unfortunately I didn’t watch for the changes in S.marmorata egg adhesiveness. It is interesting why initially adhesive eggs lost their ability to glue within some hours. Fixation of eggs on the open surfaces makes them vulnerable and elevates the chance to be eaten.
    Is this temporary adhesion of eggs on surfaces necessary for fertilization? Eggs of many fishes fall into gravel and they are succesfully fertilized. Or are much oxygen required in first hours of sewellia embryo development? Is something known about that or please share your ideas?

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355473

    olly
    Participant

    You are likely right Jim.

    @plaamoo said:
     🙂 I find the tiny fry in the water change bucket.

    It is great and my congratulations. I like S.lineolata and cannot imagine my tank without them. Amazing fish with interesting behavior.

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355470

    olly
    Participant

    Thank you Jim!

    I think I returned at home at the moment of the end of S.Marmorata spawning. The eggs were still on the substrate (the first picture above), and they were not eaten yet. I guess that the light in the tank interrupted the spawning. The Sewellia’s eggs are very adhesive and they were glued to the substrate.

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355468

    olly
    Participant

    @torso said:
    How do you breed them?

    I did nothing special. A year ago S.marmorata were young, now one female became gravid. That is great that parents were synchronized. I did not see their spawning (only gravid excited female in the morning and later eggs and dominant male with high frequency of breath and high heart rate), and I was not sure that eggs were fertilized. But fry appeared 🙂

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355467

    olly
    Participant

    Hi Charles!

    Thank you!

    Good luck with the move!

     I think that there were more than 90 eggs. Here is the most part of them at this pic (about 70). Most of them are not fertilized or were not survived. Size is about 1 mm. Only two females are in my group of S.marmorata. It is likely that all of these eggs are from the spawning of the one female. She was greatly swollen and excited with unusual behaviour in the morning of that day. Another female was thin, and I think (but  I cannot be sure) she was not involved into spawning. It is likely the egg productivity of a one sewellia is pretty high.

    S-marmorata-eggs.jpg

     Fry have great appetite, but grow very-very slowly.

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355465

    olly
    Participant

    Hi Charles!

    You are the first who bred Sewellia marmorata in the captivity. And now the photos of eggs from the spawning on November 4, 2016, prolarva on November 6 and today’s photo of larva of my Sewellia marmorata.Sewellia-marmorata-eggs1.jpg

     Sewellia-marmorata-eggs123.jpg

    Sewellia-marmorata-prolarva12.jpg

     Sewellia-marmorata-larvae16days-after-spawning1234.jpg

     

    How are your Sewellia marmorata fry doing now?

    in reply to: Sewellia lineolata, coloration patterns #355432

    olly
    Participant

    “Intermediate” pattern (closer to type1) with thick lines on the back I revealed again in a mix together with Sew04 and S.albisuera as concomitants. If a year ago I thought that it could be an artificial mix in exporter’s place, now think they live in the one river. Just a guess.

    in reply to: Sewellia lineolata, coloration patterns #355431

    olly
    Participant

    Hi Charles

    I think, the different patterns are due to the different localities. The mix is done at the exporters place.

    Yes, I think so too.

    As the catching is done with electric fishing (car battery) they may stop, when the number required is reached. Next time they move to the next river(s), as this way of fishing is very effective and can empty a river completely.

    That is awful 🙁

    What you call “intermediate” patttern could this way be just the pattern characteristic for a certain river. As Freyhof collected 99 specimen and shows two very different types of pattern, he certainly knew about these variations but didn’t mention it.
    It would be interesting to see how the different patterns look like in bred specimen over the years.

    Yes, one more relatively isolated population or even subspecies. For example, here is a pic taken in a LFS. Strange pattern (“intermediate”) . However, they are young sewellias with a size about 4 sm and it may change further. (Three sewellias of other two species.)

    S-lineolata.jpg

     

    It would be interesting to see how the different patterns look like in bred specimen over the years.

    It is very nice idea.   I think cases with breeding of S.lineolata type2 occured in someone’s tank.

    in reply to: Sewellia lineolata, coloration patterns #355429

    olly
    Participant

    Hi Charles

    Thank you very much for your great additions and interesting comments. I very hoped this topic would prove of interest to you.

    I would say type2 sewellias occur periodically and rarer in our trade in compare with type1. I saw them in LFSs for periods 0.5 year. Then type2 was rotated with type1 for about a year. I think that locality of collection are changed. Just my guess. My observation time of sewellias in stores is about 5+ years.

    However, it is difficult sometimes to ID the type in young sewellias with size smaller than 4,5 – 5 sm with developing pattern. And one more difficulty. I saw the pattern looking like intermediate. I consider them type1. I thought, the place of their collection between habitats of type1 and type2. Or I am mistaken and it is a mix as you said.

     

    Wonderful individual pattern in sewellia male (type1?) in a store: orderly precise cells, and lines on the sides disappear far from the head. Size about 7 sm TL. Bad pics without flash in LFS.

      S-lineolata-male0.jpg

     S-lineolata-male20.jpg

    in reply to: Sewellia lineolata, coloration patterns #355427

    olly
    Participant

    And it is not all. In a tank designed for discuses in one our LFS I saw S.lineolata male with pattern on the side of belly. I visited this store without camera and didn’t take a picture. However, I found a picture of the similar sewellia here http://forums.loaches.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=21024&p=182797&hilit=physoschistura#p182797 . I don’t know it is an individual mutation or this sewellia from the third population. In other shipments I have never saw sewellias with such pattern on the belly.

    in reply to: sewellia albisuera #355421

    olly
    Participant

    Thank you very much Charles. Now I have no doubts.

    These sewellias are the most shy as compared to S.lineolata, Sew03, S.marmorata.

    in reply to: sewellia albisuera #355419

    olly
    Participant

    Hi Charles,

    Thank you and thanks for your fine photos. Cute young Sew01. In Sew01 dense spotted pattern appear in young age, in S.albisuera reticulated pattern are kept in adults. I saw young imported Sew01 and S.albisuera and they were looked different. What do you think about my sewellias that I consider S. albisuera. Am I right with their ID? Are they S.albisuera or it is a variation of Sew01? Excuse me please for bad additional pics, unfortunately I cannot take the qualitative pic from the side of their belly. Only these sewellias run along the frontal glass with the speed of cockroach and without stopping. These sewellias were imported for short period of time last year in a mix with S.lineolata or without them. And later again only Sew01 appeared in import.S-albisuera.jpg

     S-albisuera2.jpg

    in reply to: sewellia albisuera #355416

    olly
    Participant

    Hi all!

    Very interesting, Charles, thanks.

    @torso said:
    Two things are clear: S. spotted SEW 01 is not S. albisurea and both have pectorals reaching the anal fin.
    Cheers Charles

     Charles, what signs may be considered exact for proper separation of Sewellia albisuera and Sew01 to different species?

    I have sewellias which I consider to be Sewellia albisuera only on the basis of their reticulated pattern. In a store tank among S.albisuera there was a big male of the size about 8 sm TL with a very rare reticulated pattern. My ones (6-7 sm TL) from this shipment have denser reticulated pattern. I am not sure that it is right to use the coloration pattern as a single feature to separate S.albisuera and Sew01 on two species. I watched for S.albisuera and Sew01 from different shipments in a one tank in a store. The pattern of Sew01 is looking like the most dense reticulate pattern of S.albisuera. If to use only this feature, S.albisuera and Sew01 look like color variations of a one species (as many color variations of Gastromyzon stellatus). Perhaps, they are geographically separated local populations of the one species.
    Which other signs do exist to differ S.albisuera and Sew01? Or do they belong to a one species? It is not clear to me yet

    Sewellia albisuera, female 7 sm TL

    sewellia-albisuera.jpg

    Sewellia albisuera, male 7sm TL

    sewellia-albisuera-male.jpg

    IMG_2354.jpg

     sewellia-albisuera-male2.jpg

    IMG_2545.jpg

     The other one about 6sm TL

    S_albisuera3.jpg

    IMG_4298.jpg

     IMG_4898.jpg

     Sewellia albisuera and Sew01 from different shipments in a one tank of the storeS_albisuera-and-Sew01.jpg

     Sew01 in a store tank sew01_22.jpg

    in reply to: Eastern Newts – Notophthalmus viridescens #355408

    olly
    Participant

    Adorable baby. Still small but already colored and bright! Great!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 109 total)