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Oreochromis

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Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • in reply to: no filter in a livebearer breeding tank? #354314

    Oreochromis
    Participant

    You could also consider a ‘best of both worlds’ approach: install a polyurethane foam block to create a separate compartment in the tank, add an airlift pipe through the PU foam and voila: you will have stable biological filtration, with only little current, so larger particles (uneaten food/faeces) will remain on the tank floor to be siphoned out.
    The addition of sufficient surface area that can be colonized by bacteria will provide more stable water quality and even have an effect on the structure of the bacterial community in the aquarium, which should give some protection against opportunistic pathogens.

    in reply to: Cardinal biotope set-up #354204

    Oreochromis
    Participant

    Thanks for the clear info Byron! I envy you for having ‘Amazon water’ coming out of the tap, this is something I can only dream of.
    I will probably resort to buying RO water as I don’t trust my rainwater: combination of air pollution and zinc coated gutters will not be very beneficial for my aquarium.

    in reply to: Tom’s Poco Pozo #353535

    Oreochromis
    Participant

    Wonderful tank, Tom!

    I imagine the tank is heated: what temperature do you have? And do you loose a lot of water due to evaporation?

    What kind of water do you use (hardness, pH)?

     

    in reply to: African Hybrids a No-no? #353226

    Oreochromis
    Participant

    Difficult topic…

    I would say hybridisation would be really a problem if the new hybrid would be able to escape and establish itself in nature. In the artificial setting that an aquarium really is, creating a hybrid seems less of a problem to me.

    One could argue that allowing the newly created hybrid to produce off-spring and allowing this off-spring to spread into the aquarium trade, somehow “spoils” the original species. But looking at how many ‘strains’ of selectively bred species are already available in the hobby, this argument does not hold anymore.

    Let’s hope there will always be some wild caught specimens available to overcome this problem and we should worry more about habitat protection than anything else.

    Btw, hybridisation is often used in aquaculture. Tilapia hybrids are used to get e.g. monosex populations (all males) avoiding the need to use hormones.

    in reply to: Trying to Save Hillstream Loaches (Gastromyzon spp.) #353119

    Oreochromis
    Participant

    I don’t have any experience with keeping Gastromyzon loaches. However, when in my previous professional life I was working in a aquaculture company raising tilapia, our veterinary used to say that raising the salinity of the water can help fish that are stressed.

    What I understood is that bringing the salinity close to the 1 g/L (similar to salinity of cells), would help fish cope with stress. Can somebody confirm this? Or should this not be generalized?

    As a side note, I would never accept to pay for fish that have been mistreated as you are describing in your post. On second thought, I would not return to that shop anymore.

    in reply to: Outdoor tropicals #353009

    Oreochromis
    Participant

    I am planning to keep the 20+ Tanichthys albonubes juveniles from end of January outside in an old plastic sandbox, which is currently housing massive quantities of mosquito larvae. But I will wait another month or so: temperatures are still quite low during the night – this morning my car indicated only 5 °C…

    in reply to: Anyone willing to talk water chemistry??? #352999

    Oreochromis
    Participant

    ourmanflint said 
     
    You can drop the ph of your water by aerating as much as possible, this will allow CO2 to dissociate into Carbonic acid which will lower your pH safely. Another very simple solution, is to use bottled or home made soda water. Soda water has a pH of about 3 – 4 so it can quickly and again more importantly safely reduce your pH without interfering with any other parameters or water quality. Just make sure it is plain soda water not flavoured! 

    Increasing CO2 can indeed lower the pH, but as soon as the CO2 escapes again, the effect will be gone. So adding soda water is not really a good idea. Also bear in mind that the CO2 concentrations in soda water will kill your fish instantly. If you want to decrease pH with CO2, use CO2 gas and carefull control the addition by measuring pH and alkalinity.

    The effect of aeration on pH can be both increase or decrease, depending on the CO2 concentration in the aquarium water. Usually, our aquarium water contains more CO2 than the equilibrium concentration (due to respiration of fish, but more importantly bacterial activity, especially in case there is a lot of organic matter and detritus present). Aerating the aquarium will cause CO2 to escape and will in fact increase the pH.

    On the other hand, in an aquarium with very strong plant growth, CO2 levels could be lower than equilibrium concentration, and in this case aeration would in fact provide CO2 to the aqarium and also cause a decrease in pH.

     

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)