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Plaamoo

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,181 total)
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  • in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355471

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Ah I see in the pic you have no substrate. It’s a bare-bottom tank. I have sand in my lineolata tank, the granules are similar size to the eggs. That’s likely why I’ve never seen them. 🙂 I find the tiny fry in the water change bucket.

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355469

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Good stuff Olly! How do you spot the eggs in the substrate?

    Charles, I hope the move goes well. Moving is a special nightmare for us fishkeepers!

    in reply to: Eastern Newts – Notophthalmus viridescens #355456

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Very nice Thomas. If I ever get more room I may have to try these.

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355453

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Great job Charles!


    Plaamoo
    Participant

    My go to is flubendazole. It’s a little bit messy but I’ve never had adverse reactions and it works 95% of the time for me. Actually.

    http://www.inkmkr.com/Fish/ItemsForSale.html

    in reply to: Eastern Newts – Notophthalmus viridescens #355409

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Very nice Thomas!

    in reply to: Matt #355406

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    His wife recently posted the upcoming birth of another child on facebook.  I haven’t heard from him in ages! I get the feeling that he’s taking a hiatus from social media. I wouldn’t worry.

    in reply to: Sudden Death – Any ideas #355405

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    I can’t tell you what actually killed your fish, but a 5 gal tank is not nearly big enough for them. I can’t believe that your nitrates are 0 in that situation. I’d try different test. No matter how good you thing your shop is, everything should be quarantined before being added.

    in reply to: Gastromyzon ID #355388

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Nice fish Olly. Zebrinus variation was the first thing that cam to my mind also, but just a thought. Maybe Charles will come along with an opinion.

    in reply to: Cycling my 29 gallon #355357

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    @entomancer said:
    Your plants may be absorbing all of the ammonia.
    Did you fill the tank with water from your tap? If so, I really doubt you’re low on carbonates, unless you have very soft/acidic tap water (it’s generally kind of rare in the US).

    My tap measures kh 1-2. Common in this area. If I don’t add buffer tanks crash hard.

    in reply to: Listen very carefully to my tale of waterchange woe… #355345

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    @BillT said:
    Another possible problem associated with water changing is the introduction of supersaturated water to your tank.
    This can happen if your tap water is coming to your house cold in the pipes under pressure. Large amounts of trapped air in pipes can be forced into solution in the cold water because cold water can hold much more dissolved gas than warm water can.
    If you want to get an idea of how much gas can be dissolved in cold water, consider what happens when you drop a Mentos into some Pepsi.
    Taking the water out of the pressurized environment of the pipes and then warming it up will result in the excess air in the water coming out as small bubbles, either in the water, on surfaces or in the tissues of fish. CO2 is a special case but it gets the idea across.
    Besides seeing bubbles, you may notice the fish may going down to the deepest part of the aquarium where the water pressure is greatest. This will somewhat counteract the forces driving bubble formation in their tissues.
    Aeration will help remove excess air from the water in the aquarium. Spraying the water (lots of surface area and turbulence) before putting in to the aquarium can reduce supersaturation.
    Larger water changes can make the effects of this condition worse since there is more supersaturated water going into the aquarium and less normal water to dilute the excess air in the supersaturated water.
    This is often more of a problem in the winter when tap water gets cold before getting to your home.

    That’s all new and very interesting to me Bill, Thanks!

    in reply to: Listen very carefully to my tale of waterchange woe… #355341

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    My first thought to your initial problem, the fish staying at the bottom but returning to normal after lights out, is that your lights are too bright.

    When doing water changes it’s important to know the chemistry of both your tank water and the change water. If there is a substantial difference it could result in osmotic shock. This could be what cause the big dye off? Is it possible that some contaminate made it’s way into the tank? Get some means of testing gh/kh and monitor both until you get them figured out. Liquid test kits or tds meter work for me. You shouldn’t need to add bacteria with water changes. I use prime but many don’t use anything. It depends a lot on your water source, whether they treat with chlorine or chloromine.

    Good luck going forward!

    in reply to: River tank questions. #355336

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    You’re not going to get one directional flow in that tank. The way you have it in the vid looks fine to me. Move it around and see what works for you.

    in reply to: River tank questions. #355334

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    It sounds to me like you have enough movement/turnover as it is. Add substrate, rocks etc. and see how it feels. You don’t need a torrent.

    in reply to: River tank questions. #355332

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Looks fine to me. It’s hard to tell how much current there is from the vid. I’m not a fan of the river tank manifold. I built one years ago and eventually tore it down. I’d just add another powerhead if you want more movement.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,181 total)