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torso

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 516 total)
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  • in reply to: Gastromyzon ID #355393

    torso
    Participant

    Gastromyzon sp. Not identified

     

    DSC_5184-2.jpg

     DSC_5197-2.jpg

     DSC_5215-2.jpg

     DSC_5213-2.jpg

    in reply to: Gastromyzon ID #355392

    torso
    Participant

    Sorry, I almost missed the thread.

    G. stellatus as far I can judge it. Colour can vary from more greyish to green.

    Mucus as consequence of injuries is not rare, normally the specimen won’t survive in the export, at least shouldn’t be shipped (there’s a new exporter at work). I had just once a batch in the import. They didn’t make it. Will try to find the pics. Sometimes they turn up in local shops of a retail chain, always from the same local importer and together with B. kweichowensis also injured.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Sewellia marmorata #355348

    torso
    Participant

    Sewellia SEW 02 were more efficient lately in a identic tank-set. I don’t think, S. marmorata is different in spawning. Saw some attempts, but no offspring as for SEW 02.

    in reply to: Brachygobius sp. ‘Ocelot’ #355339

    torso
    Participant

    Hi Matt

    Should be B. xantomelas. Pattern doesn’t differ a lot, so it’s to be expected not to represent a new species. Like most Brachygobius they do well in hard water, for breeding it should be softend down to 8-10 KH.

    Your specimen seems to be good conditioned, sometimes they arrrive in a terrible condition.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Any guesses about this Sewellia? #355219

    torso
    Participant

    B. kweichowensis: TL 8

    B. leveretti: TL 12

    B.-leveretti-blog.sina_.com-60585513gx6CxFfsibF4b690.jpeg

     

     B.-leveretti-blog.sina_.com-60585513gx6CxFf0C1D0d690-1.jpeg

     Beaufortia_leveretti_n2.jpg

     beaufortia_leveretti_1_20140708_1462893598.jpg

     beaufortia_leveretti_2_20140708_1889986498.jpg

     beaufortia_leveretti_3_20140708_1083897922.jpg

     beaufortia_leveretti_4_20140708_1469349586.jpg

     

    B. k. gracilicauda is a synonym, right?

    Your species is larger, than B. kweichowensis, right? It’ closer to B. leveretti in bodyshape, right?

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Sewellia IDs #355201

    torso
    Participant

    Mikev said

    “not really… the author is mistaken that this condition is always a bacterial disease, and also that it is always minocycline-treatable. But no argument that this is a bad sign.”

    I agree, Mikev. That’s why in import-stations there is always a diagnosis first.

    @ Kim

    As for the situation in EU:

    http://www.manaus-aquarium.com/trichosal.php

    is a good choice. Available in EU. Best stuff on the market at the moment. As for all fish with completely/partly lacking scales: tight controlling of the effects.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Sewellia breeding with or without snails #355184

    torso
    Participant

    and I doubt it, Kim.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Sewellia breeding with or without snails #355181

    torso
    Participant

    That will do, Kim.

    I my tanks, the waterflow is directed from the right/left corner backside to the front glass. A flat large stone in front – like the one at left – placed in the backflow from the front glass helps the spawning pair to swim up once they cling together. Eggs drive away and fall into the coarse gravel.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Microctenopoma damasi #355180

    torso
    Participant

    wonderful.

    I tried for years to get the species without success.

    Cheers Charles.

    in reply to: Annamia Normani #355173

    torso
    Participant

    Normal procedure would be, to give all infos on the website, Matt. That’s the the purpose of the site.  As he hasn’t even mentioned the “breeding” before I think, infos will be kept back for the issue to be first. I can understand, that the magazines like the “primeur” and authors like to be printed, but it is certainly disappointing for the website-team, which tries to keep up the idea of a breeding program.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Annamia Normani #355170

    torso
    Participant

    un update with breeding news from Germany

    http://my-fish.org/annamia-normani/#comment-7185

    Looking forward to the AMAZONAS-issue.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Sewellia breeding with or without snails #355154

    torso
    Participant

    Hi Kim

    I tried different setups with groups of 8-12 adults.

    Without snails and a thick layer of coarse gravel – gives the best results. I stopped this setup. See below.

    With snails: important is a thick layer of coarse gravel – up to 15 mm diameter. Larger snails can’t enter the substrate, young Planorbarius corneus and Melanoides tuberculatus do. Up to 100-200 specimen in half a year (S. speciosa and S. sp SEW 02 are less productive).

    With snails and sand: some offspring always turns up

    With snails and shrimps: best result with coarse gravel, with sand still some offspring.

    With Hyalella azteca (accidentelly), snails and shrimps: some offspring. Lowest rate of all setups

    Best setup seems to be (didn’t try yet): a thick layer of coarse expanded clay and aspirating every week. As they can easily produce 400-500 eggs per month and given, that S. lineolata and S. sp. spotted are hard to stop once they started to spawn, that leads to a shedload of youngsters. The guys in Germany, who tried it back in 2009 soon stopped the trial.

    I use shrimps to bring down the rate, because to sell offspring in great quantities is not worth the effort as they need about a year to reach a selling size of 4 cm.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Erromyzon sp “red spots” #355122

    torso
    Participant

    If I had newer ventral pics of the group, I could be more affirmative, Olly. There is a rest of uncertainty.

    Cheers Charles

    in reply to: Macropodus spp. maximum size (SL) #355119

    torso
    Participant

    TL, Matt. I’ve kept had M. opercularis in a large pond in summer, more than 12 cm TL counting the filaments of the tail fin. But 12 cm TL proximal from snout to tail for M. opercualris, M. spechti and M. ocellatus is a good size, hardly to be exceeded.

    I haven’t kept the other spp

    in reply to: Erromyzon sp “red spots” #355116

    torso
    Participant

    I agree. The most conclusive is this female

    DSC_7532-1.jpg

     But there is another point: the form of the genital papilla. In this case it’s like that

    Detail-DSC_7532.jpg

     As I have no further pics of sexually active specimen which would give a clue, I tried to come back to the pics taken after coming in of the shipment. If I don’t miss the sexing by what you pointed out we have a female

    DSC_4294.jpg

    and detail

     Detail-DSC_4294.jpg

     

    another female

     Detail-DSC_4236.jpg

    and males

    Detail-DSC_4342-2.jpg

     Detail-DSC_4332.jpg

     Detail-DSC_4310.jpg

    I don’t know if it helps much. And to be shure it would need some more pics of sexually active specimen.

    Sometimes I’m happy to see, that my fish seem to know more

    Cheers Charles

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 516 total)

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