LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Aulonocara hansbaenschi MEYER, RIEHL & ZETZSCHE, 1987

Red Shoulder Peacock

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

Some eminent authors believe this species to be a geographical variant of the highly variable congener A. stuartgranti rather than a distinct taxon but since most popular resources continue to view it as valid we also list it here.

At Masinje it has been observed to show a distinct preference for rocky caves and crevices in relatively shallow (3-6 metres deep) water. This is in contrast to most other members of the genus, which tend to forage over sand, but similar to behaviour seen in A. jacobfreibergi.

1 comment » | Category: ,

Aulonocara jacobfreibergi (JOHNSON, 1974)

Malawi Butterfly

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

This was one of the first Aulonocara spp. to enter the hobby and its popularity has endured. It’s known by several other vernacular names including ‘Freiberg’s peacock’, ‘fairy cichlid’ and ‘African butterfly’ as well as the erroneous ‘scientific’ names Trematocranus trevori, T. jacobfreigbergi and T. regina. A naturally-occurring, yellowish form from Undu reef, Tanzania is often referred to as ‘lemon jake’.

It can be told apart from most other members of the genus by the broad, pale distal margins in the dorsal, anal and caudal fins, more deeply-forked caudal fin and larger adult size.

Comment » | Category: ,

Aulonocara ethelwynnae MEYER, RIEHL & ZETZSCHE, 1987

Northern Aulonocara

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

Endemic to Lake Malawi where it was described from and only occurs around ‘Chitendi Island’, now normally referred to as Chitande island plus a short stretch of coastline between Ngara and Chilumba along the lake’s northwestern shoreline.

Aulonocara spp. are benthophagous by nature employing a method of feeding whereby mouthfuls of substrate are taken and sifted for edible items with the remaining material expelled via the gills and mouth. They’re equally-skilled at hunting as grazing, tending to hover above the substrate until tiny movements are detected, and possess enlarged sensory pores on the head which assist in this technique.

Comment » | Category: ,

Aulonocara baenschi MEYER & RIEHL, 1985

New Yellow Regal Peacock

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

This species may also be sold variously as ‘yellow regal cichlid’, ‘Baensch’s peacock’, ‘sunshine peacock’ and ‘Nkhomo-Benga peacock’. The easiest way to distinguish it from similar-looking congeners is to look at the profile of the snout, which is steeper and more curved than that of its congeners.

Aulonocara spp. are benthophagous by nature employing a method of feeding whereby mouthfuls of substrate are taken and sifted for edible items with the remaining material expelled via the gills and mouth. They’re equally-skilled at hunting as grazing, tending to hover above the substrate until tiny movements are detected, and possess enlarged sensory pores on the head which assist in this technique.

Comment » | Category: ,

Altolamprologus compressiceps (BOULENGER, 1898)

Compressiceps

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

This species varies in colour pattern depending on locality. Some of them are sold under several such names with the variant from Kigoma being known variously as A. compressiceps "Kigoma red", "Kigoma red fin", "Kigoma orange top" or "firefin" for example. The different populations should ideally be kept apart in aquaria and clearly labelled with collection locality in order to avoid hybridisation.

Forms popular in the aquarium hobby include:

– &quo…

Comment » | Category: ,

Aristochromis christyi TREWAVAS, 1935

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

This is currently the only described member ofthe genus and despite having a wide distribution, it's not particularly common in Lake Malawi. Correspondingly it's not seen all that often in the hobby either. It's beak-like mouthparts are specially adapted to allow it to hunt smaller fish among crevices between rocks. It can also extend the mouth in all four directions at once, allowing it to swallow prey up to around 4" long!

As well as hunting amongst rocks, Aristoch…

1 comment » | Category: ,

Altolamprologus calvus (POLL, 1978)

Calvus

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

A. calvus is a predator by nature and its body shape has been adapted to allow it to enter small crevices and gaps in the rockwork of Lake Tanganyika to prey on eggs, fry and small fish. Its laterally compressed shape makes the fish hard to spot head on, giving it an advantage over would be predators and prey alike. It is also quite well-armoured, possessing thick scales which can be turned towards potential attackers. These can cause real damage with their serrated edges.

Several colour form…

Comment » | Category: ,

Andinoacara rivulatus (GÜNTHER, 1860)

Gold Saum

March 13th, 2012 — 1:19pm

Native to extreme northern Peru and coastal drainages of western Ecuador as far north as the Río Esmereldas drainage and possibly beyond. The form from the Esmereldas and above may represent a different species (see ‘notes’).

1 comment » | Category: ,

Astronotus ocellatus (AGASSIZ, 1831)

Oscar

March 13th, 2012 — 1:19pm

This species is also referred to as ‘velvet cichlid’, ‘red oscar’, ‘tiger oscar’, or ‘marble cichlid’.

It is a popular aquarium fish although its adult size and typical life-span of 10-20 years must be taken into account before purchase. Numerous ornamental strains are now available, and while care is more-or-less identical for all of them a degree of additional care must be taken with the ‘long-finned’ variety which is a little less competitive than other forms.

2 comments » | Category: ,

Andinoacara pulcher (GILL, 1858)

Blue Acara

March 13th, 2012 — 1:19pm

This species was previously known as ‘Aequidens’ pulcher but has been considered s member of the genus Andinoacara since 2009.

2 comments » | Category: ,