LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Nematabramis steindachnerii POPTA, 1905

November 14th, 2014 — 11:39am
Michael Lo

Endemic to northern and central Borneo, with records from the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah, Brunei Darussalam, and the Indonesian provinces North Kalimantan (Kalimantan Utara) and East Kalimantan (Kalimantan Timur).

Type locality is ‘Kajan River, eastern slope of central Kalimantan, Indonesia [Borneo]’.

Comment » | Category: ,

Nematabramis everetti BOULENGER, 1894

November 13th, 2014 — 9:07pm
Michael Lo

Nematabramis species are found a variety of habitat-types, from swiftly-flowing affluent streams to pools, lakes, and degraded swamps. Based on the available collection records juveniles and subadults of N. everetti display a preference for fast-moving water whereas adults are found in deeper, slower stretches of minor tributaries.

Comment » | Category: ,

Nematabramis borneensis INGER & CHIN, 1962

November 12th, 2014 — 8:25pm
Marco Endruweit

It looks particularly similar to N. alestes with both species possessing a colour pattern comprising a dark lateral stripe on the body, but can be distinguished immediately by possessing barbels longer than the head (vs. shorter than the head in N. alestes).

Comment » | Category: ,

Nematabramis alestes (SEALE & BEAN, 1907)

November 12th, 2014 — 7:03pm
Zhou Hang

N. alestes is the only member of the genus in which the barbels are shorter than the head, with additional diagnostic characters as follows: 8-9 branched dorsal-fin rays; 12-14 branched anal-fin rays; 22-23 predorsal scales; body with a pronounced ventral keel.

Comment » | Category: ,

Laubuka siamensis FOWLER, 1939

October 29th, 2014 — 9:04pm
Kamphol Udomritthiruj

Considered synonymous with the congener L. laubuca for a number of years, thus reports of that species from anywhere in Indochina actually refer to the current concept of L. siamensis.

Given the distribution of L. siamensis, it seems likely that many of the fish entering the aquarium trade are also this species and not L. laubuca. The two species can be distinguished by…

Comment » | Category: ,

Laubuka laubuca (HAMILTON, 1822)

Indian Glass Barb

October 29th, 2014 — 4:20pm
Choy Heng Wah

Probably endemic to northern India, Bangladesh, and Nepal. Records from Sri Lanka, southern India, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Indonesia appear to represent other species.

Given the distribution of L. siamensis, it seems likely that many of the fish entering the aquarium trade are this species and not L. laubuca. The two species can be distinguished b…

Comment » | Category: ,

Laubuka dadiburjori MENON, 1952

Dadio

October 26th, 2014 — 9:02pm
Choy Heng Wah

It can be distinguished from other members of the genus by the following characters: lateral line absent or perforating only 2-5 scales; pharyngeal teeth hooked; body size small, not exceeding 30 mm SL; body depth less than 25 % SL; colour pattern comprising a dark bluish lateral stripe extending from the eye to the caudal peduncle, typically, but not always, forming 2-5 circular spots along its length.

Comment » | Category: ,

Laubuka caeruleostigmata SMITH, 1931

Flying Minnow

October 26th, 2014 — 8:52pm
Choy Heng Wah

This species is also known as ‘leaping barb’ and was once quite common in the ornamental trade but is now seldom seen.

It can be distinguished from other members of the genus by the following characters: bright blue spot on top of head; series of 4-5 short faint bars on anterior portion of body; 19-23½ branched anal-fin rays; body depth fits 2.1-2.9 times in SL.

Comment » | Category: ,

Danionella translucida ROBERTS, 1986

October 18th, 2014 — 5:47pm
Choy Heng Wah

The anatomical structure of miniaturised cyprinids can vary greatly; there are two putative groups with some species possessing intermediate features to some degree. The first contains those fishes which though small are essentially proportionally dwarfed versions of their larger relatives.

The other includes those in which anatomical development stops at a point where adult still resemble a larval form of their larger ancestor, as in…

Comment » | Category: ,

Danionella priapus BRITZ, 2009

October 18th, 2014 — 5:02pm
Beta Mahatvaraj

As far as we know this species has not been bred in aquaria although Pete Liptrot and Paul Dixon of the Bolton Museum Aquarium, UK, have achieved great success with an unidentified congener. They first noticed fry from their group of 24 adults after moving the school to a dedicated set-up planted with mature Java moss and have since rewarded with regular batches of fry.

Comment » | Category: ,