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Search results for ‘Botia’

Botia udomritthiruji NG, 2007

Emperor Botia

March 13th, 2012 — 1:25pm

Known only from the Tanintharyi River drainage in Tanintharyi (previously Tenasserim) Division, southern Myanmar. Tanintharyi lies on the Kra Isthmus and the river bisects the central zone north-to-south before emptying into the Andaman Sea at Mergui/Myeik.

This area is not easy to access for fish collectors due to occasional conflict between the Myanma…

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Paracanthocobitis botia (HAMILTON, 1822)

Zipper Loach

March 13th, 2012 — 1:22pm

Traded under various names including ‘mottled’, ‘eyepot’, ‘sand’ and ‘striped’ loach. It’s perhaps one of the better choices for those new to keeping nemacheilids being relatively hardy, peaceful and exhibiting some quirky behavioural traits. The characteristic ocellus, a dark marking at the top of the caudal peduncle that resembles an eye, is thought to have some function in predator distraction and is normally more intense in younger specimens.

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Botia striata NARAYAN RAO, 1920

Zebra Loach

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

In a survey of fish diversity in the Bhadra River (which joins the Tunga to form the Tungabhadra) it was recorded alongside numerous other species including Puntius chola, Balitora mysorensis, and Mystus armatus. Dry season water paramaters were temperature 69.8°F/21°C, pH 7.0, hardness ~ 2.5°.

The substrate was composed of bedrock, boulders, cobbles, gravel, sand and leaf litter in descending order of abundance with a maximum depth of around…

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Botia almorhae GRAY, 1831

Yo-Yo Loach

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

The physical appearance of B. almorhae sensu stricto is something of a mystery. No pictures of live specimens appear in any scientific publications we’ve read and we’ve been unable to find a certified image of one anywhere meaning it’s possibly never been seen in the aquarium trade. Instead the most commonly available members of the nominal species grouping seem to be B. lohachata, B. sp. ‘Kosi’ and B. sp. ‘Teesta’ (see individual notes below), plus the assorted hybrids that have appeared since the turn of the century (Grant, 2007).

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Botia rostrata GÜNTHER, 1868

March 13th, 2012 — 1:25pm

Within the nominal species grouping suggested by Grant (2007) almost all B. rostrata sold in the hobby are B. sp. 'upper Brahmaputra' with B. rostrata sensu stricto rarely, if ever, available. Trade names include 'Gangetic loach', 'twin-banded loach' and 'ladder loach'. The defining characters of the group are "Pattern consisiting of 8-10 black to dark brown body bars that exhibit pale and numerous spots in juveniles, and in adults the bars can anast…

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Leptobotia elongata (BLEEKER, 1870)

Imperial Flower Loach

March 13th, 2012 — 1:25pm

This species is rare in the aquarium trade, increasingly so in nature and as a result prohibitively expensive when available. Given its adult size and probable longevity this is therefore a species for the specialist possessing the necessary time, money and dedication to house it long term.

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Sinibotia pulchra (WU, 1939)

Golden Zebra Loach

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

This species is also sold under the vernacular names 'golden Chinese loach' and '12-banded Chinese loach'. Along with S. robusta it's the most commonly-traded member of the genus, and the two are often imported in mixed batches, presumably because they occur and are thus collected together in nature. Like most congeners it has a highly flexible, sinuous body which makes it very interesting to observe.

S. pulchra can be differentiated from…

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Sinibotia robusta (WU, 1939)

Kansu Loach

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

This species is also sold under the vernacular names 'golden Chinese loach' and '12-banded Chinese loach'. Along with S. pulchra it's the most commonly-traded member of the genus, and the two are often imported in mixed batches, presumably because they occur and are thus collected together in nature.

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Leptobotia rubrilabris (DABRY DE THIERSANT, 1872)

March 13th, 2012 — 1:25pm

Should be kept in a set-up designed to resemble a flowing stream with a substrate of variably-sized rocks, gravel and some water-worn boulders. This can be further furnished with driftwood roots and branches arranged to form some shaded spots while lengths of PVC piping or similar can be used to provide additional cover. Although most plant species will fail to thrive in such surroundings hardy genera such as Microsorum, Bolbitis or Anubias spp. can be grown attached to the décor and bright lighting will promote the growth of aufwuchs.

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Yasuhikotakia modesta (BLEEKER, 1864)

Redtail Loach

March 13th, 2012 — 1:20pm

This species is one of the more commonly-encountered botiids in the hobby and is also sold as ‘blue’, ‘orange-finned’, or ‘red-finned’ botia/loach. It’s sometimes subject to artificial colouring with bright blue or purple dyes and we strongly recommend you do not purchase such fish (they’re illegal in several countries).

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