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Lamontichthys filamentosus (LA MONTE, 1935)

Sturgeon Catfish

June 23rd, 2013 — 10:08pm

This species is relatively common in the aquarium hobby but is not easy to maintain and recommended only for experienced aquarists.

It can be told apart from all congeners by specimens larger than 60 mm SL possessing an extended pectoral-fin spine forming an extremely long filament that may be more than four times the length of the first branched pectoral-fin ray (vs. not possessing such a filament in other species of Lamontichthys).

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Hypostomus sp.

L231

June 23rd, 2013 — 9:05pm

Supposedly exported from the upper Amazon region in Peru but precise details are lacking.

It’s unclear whether this unidentified species is conspecific with the similarly nameless congener L266 or not.

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Peckoltia bachi (BOULENGER, 1898)

L146, L232, LDA030, Bola Pleco

June 23rd, 2013 — 1:26pm

This species has had several L-numbers assigned to it, with L146 collected from an unspecified locality in Colombia and L232 from the Río Putomayo/Içá.

It’s exported for the aquarium trade under a number of different generic names including Hemiancistrus, Sophiancistrus and Peckoltichthys.

Following Armbruster (2008) it can be to…

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Corydoras splendens (CASTELNAU, 1855)

Emerald 'Brochis'

June 18th, 2013 — 10:57pm

This species was formerly included in the genus Brochis alongside C. britskii and C. multiradiatus, and is sometimes referred to as ‘common brochis’. Juveniles have a mottled colour pattern and are sometimes traded as ‘hi-fin cory’ due to their enlarged dorsal-fin.

C. splendens can be told apart from other ex-Brochis species by possession of 10-12 dorsal-fin rays…

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Corydoras multiradiatus (ORCÉS V., 1960)

Hognose 'Brochis'

June 18th, 2013 — 9:27pm

The genus is included in the family Callichthyidae, of which members are often referred to collectively as ‘armoured’ or ‘mailed’ catfishes group due to the presence of bony plates in place of scales on the body.

Their taxonomy can be confusing, and numerous undescribed species are also thought to exist.

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Boulengerella maculata (VALENCIENNES, 1850)

March 19th, 2013 — 9:03am

Both species also possesses a broader dark midlateral stripe on the body which tends to be more well-defined in B. lateristriga than in B. maculata.

Colour pattern in B. maculata varies considerably with some specimens noticeably paler than others, for example, and the the broad midlateral stripe usually less intense in such individuals.

This does not app…

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Cynodon gibbus (AGASSIZ, 1829)

March 13th, 2013 — 11:13pm

This species is rare in the aquarium trade but is arguably more suitable for the home aquarium than some of its better-known relatives given its adult size and relatively docile behaviour.

Other vernacular names include ‘Dientón’ (Peru), ‘Perrito’ (Ecuador), ‘Payara-chata’ or ‘Payarin’ (Venezuela) and ‘Icanga’, ‘Minguilista’ or ‘Peice-cachorro’ (Brazil), some of which are also applied to related species.

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Axelrodia stigmatias (FOWLER, 1913)

March 8th, 2013 — 4:13pm

It’s most similar to A. riesei but can be told apart by its more-elongate body (depth 4-5 times, vs. 3.1-3.5 times, in SL), live body colour (silvery yellow, vs. red) and suborbital bone structure (almost complete, vs. reduced).

The third species, A. lindeae, is quite different posses…

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Trochilocharax ornatus ZARSKE, 2010

Hummingbird Tetra

March 7th, 2013 — 4:41pm

This species is not often available and is much sought after in the aquarium hobby where it’s been traded as ‘crystal rainbow tetra’ and ‘orange-tailed glass tetra’.

It’s also been referred to as a Heterocharax or Tyttocharax species in the past.

It’s currently the only member of its genus which is separated fr…

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Copella nattereri (STEINDACHNER, 1876)

March 6th, 2013 — 11:54am

This species is sometimes traded as C. sp. ‘red line’, ‘spotted tetra’ or as its congener C. nigrofasciata.

In the past it’s name was also widely applied to the fish now identified as C. callolepis and C. meinkeni, and this misidentification continues to an extent although the two are easily-distinguished by the fact that C. nattereri is the only one of the three possessing a dark lateral stripe on each side of the body.

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