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Betta albimarginata?

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Betta albimarginata?

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)
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  • #319881

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Thanks for all the help guys! I’m still pondering the situation. They’re $25 each so I’m being careful. I went to the shop yesterday and asked to test the ph in their tank. As it turns out, it had crashed and was barely 6 with 0 kh. My ph is approx.7.2 with kh 1-3 which is typical for our local water. I didn’t want to take a chance with the difference. What are your thoughts on these fishes’ tolerance to such differences in ph?
    From what I can see there are only 3 young males in the tank and they are pretty agressive with each other. Does that typically subside after they settle in and establish an order? I’m not one who likes to watch my fish terrorize each other.

    #319886

    Stefan
    Member

    They like and need a pH around 6.5 but I wouldn’t do 7(+). So 6-6.5 is best. I’ve bred them from 4.5 to 6.5 and all goes fine, but the 6.5 is better for them.

    #319887

    Colin
    Participant

    I have had them kept and bred down to the 3s with no problem but as Stefan says they breed fine in the 6s too

    #319889

    oaken
    Participant

    Never kept albimarginata but channoides. They bred fine in my tapwater which has a pH of 8.4 and kH 3. But since the water is so soft it drops to around 7.5. That being said I did get very few males and loads of females, don’t know if the pH had something do with it?

    #319892

    Stefan
    Member

    QUOTE (oaken @ Dec 15 2010, 07:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Never kept albimarginata but channoides. They bred fine in my tapwater which has a pH of 8.4 and kH 3. But since the water is so soft it drops to around 7.5. That being said I did get very few males and loads of females, don’t know if the pH had something do with it?

    I guess it had something to do with it. A very dangerous move, by the way, since channoides is the blackwater species whereas albi are the slightly-below-neutral-water species.

    #319899

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Really appreciate all the help! While we’re at it, care to share your favorite methods of lowering PH, and keeping it stable? I’ve already added a large almond leave to this 5 gal tank with no change after a week.

    #319900

    Matt
    Keymaster

    How soft is your water Jim?

    #319903

    Stefan
    Member

    I always use highly active peat granules meant for ponds. Use only a bit, say a good spoon full to get 6.5-ish. Adding leaves won’t do too much.

    #319912

    oaken
    Participant

    QUOTE (Stefan @ Dec 15 2010, 08:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I guess it had something to do with it. A very dangerous move, by the way, since channoides is the blackwater species whereas albi are the slightly-below-neutral-water species.

    Got lots of respect for your opinion Stefan, but I don’t consider keeping blackwater species in higher pH (around neutral) to be a dangerous move. I think keeping them in hard water would be a dangerous move though

    #319914

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Dec 15 2010, 11:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    How soft is your water Jim?

    Soft Matt. gh & kh 1-3


    Thanks Stefan!

    I’ve read this opinion more than once. Still trying to get my head around the whole issue.

    #319915

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I agree with Gustav too – conductivity/TDS/hardness appear to be more important than pH for most fishes.

    Jim your water is like mine was in the UK and I used to use a product for hydroponic plant growth containing almost 81% phosphoric acid. It’s strictly handle with care but when added in minute quantities is very effective at lowering pH.

    Even a small bottle like this will last you ages.

    #319916

    Stefan
    Member

    Interesting because that’s not my experience with Betta and Badis where I found pH to be equally important.

    #319918

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Dec 16 2010, 07:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I agree with Gustav too – conductivity/TDS/hardness appear to be more important than pH for most fishes.

    Jim your water is like mine was in the UK and I used to use a product for hydroponic plant growth containing almost 81% phosphoric acid. It’s strictly handle with care but when added in minute quantities is very effective at lowering pH.

    Even a small bottle like this will last you ages.

    Thanks for that Matt. I’ll see if I can find something similar here. API makes a PH down that is suphuric acid. Is phosphoric better than suphuric? I’m not a big fan of heavily peat stained water though i guess if we’re going to keep these fish we should try to keep them as natural as possible.

    Just to add, my water comes out of the tap at tds 54. Tanks are between 65-100 without intentional manipulation so far.

    #319920

    Colin
    Participant

    is one drawback to phosphoric acid not that higher phosphates can result? I have had similar discussions recently about using acid to drop the pH

    I got a new KH kit just last week and it is registering 0-1 making it hard to actually tell when the liquid changes colour!

    usually i just let it drop naturally, which it can do quite quickly with that KH

    #319924

    oaken
    Participant

    Btw for lowering pH I like to use a product from Amtra called Oak Bark Extract. It’s probably some diluted acid so it’s a bit easier to handle, but don’t last you as long obviously. For my soft water it lasts a long time though.

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