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Cuba 2012

Home Forums Field Trips & Conservation Cuba 2012

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 54 total)
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  • #348388

    nuchal man
    Participant

    The pics do look like Nandopsis tetracanthus. It’s a fairly variable species and quite a few sub-species have been described. Unfortunately, not a lot of work has been done on Cuban cichlids recently other than Chakrabaty’s paper in 2006.  It’s definitely not Nandopsis ramsdeni. I’m not sure what invasive cichlid species Cuba has other than the Oreochromis and Tilapia, but the only other genus of fish it could be going of melanin pattern would be Parachromis, but the fish look far more like a Nandopsis to me. Have any more pics of them Matt?

    #348391

    oaken
    Participant

    Interesting pictures as always, Matt. Did you come across any Rivulus on your trip by any chance?

    #348392

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Sorry Sam, those are the best ones sadly. :-/ Wish we’d had more time and I’ve definitely put more effort into catching some. was thinking that N. ramsdeni must be out as this is the west of the island and it’s endemic to the east. Does it look very different? Are there any comparative pics of the different forms of N. tetracanthus anywhere?

     

    Thanks Gustav! Quite a few more pics to sort through yet and Rivulus might be involved at some point.:D Sorry for slow updates – life a bit crazy just now as planning a wedding (mine) in August.

    #348398

    nuchal man
    Participant

    Not live photographs. I don’t think any of the fish in the hobby now (maybe a very few) have any collection data on them either so it would be impossible to know. There are some good plates from the descriptions in 1903, but I don’t have the document to send to you.

    #348426

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Got hold of that reference Sam (Eigenmann right?), and the one in which the subspecies are all synonymised with N. tetracanthus is here. Seems that not a lot of work has been done since?

    Here are some more pics of a trip we made the next morning to a small reserve quite close to the hotel. The reserve is located in a mangrove swamp and we saw several brown pelicans flying by (no pics sadly) on the way. There were several large termite mounds inside and lots of anoles, think these are all Anolis sagrei but would appreciate confirmation?

     

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    #348427

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Here we have a blue-tailed ameiva, Ameiva auberi, followed by a Cuban curlytail, Leiocephalus cubensis, and the one we were really pleased to see, Cuban rock/ground iguana Cyclura nubila. There were also two places where it was possible to get to the water and we found brackish-water populations of Limia vittata in both.

     

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    #348428

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Some random shots from later in the day, messing around on the beach. Lizard is a northern curly-tail, Leiocephalus carinatus, bird is greater Antillean grackle, Quiscalus niger, doing its display thing. Anyone know what the molluscy-type things are?

    As the sun began to go down lots of little crabs started washing up.

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    #348430

    oaken
    Participant

    Nice. Were those Limia vittata the only fish present (that you could see)?

    #348431

    coelacanth
    Participant

    Chitons, there are 26 spp. known from around the area, and they are hard to ID from a photo….

    #348441

    Matt
    Keymaster

    There were Gambusia (probably G. rhizophorae) too Gustav but couldn’t get any using the small net I had with me without getting very wet and dirty. Very likely to be other species knowcking around but we didn’t stay all that long due to complaints about the smell from the family.

    Cheers Pete, never seen them before. These things can move about it seems?

    Here are some pics from a morning trip to the freshwater fish breeding station at the Ciénega de Zapata wetland. Thanks very much to Andrés and Rafael who were very welcoming and in the case of the latter had travelled several hours to meet us.

    This place is of course government-sponsored thus we weren’t permitted to take any fish since all native species are protected by law. Most unfortunate as it turned out.

    Edit: in the covered area are unfiltered aquaria containing several Girardinus spp., Quintana atrizonaRivulus cylindraceus, and a very cool little freshwater atherinid called Alepidomus evermanni. Didn’t really have time for pics unfortunately.

    The other fish pictured are being bred outdoors in long, narrow troughs and are Cubanichthys cubensis (males very colourful and females with a single dark stripe. Also very small!), and Cyprinodon riverendi (the one with the impressive dorsal fin is a male). Leaving here empty-handed was possibly the lowest point of the whole trip although the experience itself was incredible.

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    #348442

    Matt
    Keymaster

    After the small stuff it was onto the larger critters and live food-rearing facilities…all very impressive considering the lack of filtration and other basic equipment.

    Edit: this is the Cuban gar, Atractosteus tristoechus, which occurs naturally in the park.

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    #348452

    nuchal man
    Participant

    Awesome pics Matt. Love the pup fish and the gar. Yep, that’s the paper. Thanks for the link. Hopefully, someone will start some projects on the cichlids of Cuba. I’d love to do it myself, but the legal and funding issues make me think it’s not going to happen in the near future for me anyways.

    #348455

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Cheers Sam! Do you know if there’s been anything at all published on Cuban fishes in recent years? From what the guys were saying it doesn’t sound like there’s an active ichthyologist in the country though some conservation work is being done.

    P.S. earlier two posts edited to include species names.

    #348464

    coelacanth
    Participant

    @Matt said:
    Cheers Pete, never seen them before. These things can move about it seems?

     

    Yes, just like limpets and the like.

    #348469

    aquaman
    Participant

    Nice pics,they are very good:smile:

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 54 total)

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