LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Cycling My Aquarium

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Cycling My Aquarium

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 87 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #304510

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Cute set-up

    #304513

    Sofia
    Member

    Thanks

    #304515

    Sofia
    Member

    I have tested Ammonia and Nitrite again today and they are both still 0
    However, I did a low range pH and a high range pH test. The low one said 7.6 so practically was maxed, which made me think that maybe our pH is off that chart. So did the high one and yes, it went up to 8.0!
    In the description it said that if the test result of the high end one was not on the chart the water would stay clear, or at least not do anything.
    The low end one ranges from 6.0 to 7.6 and the high range one from 7.4 to 8.8. I assume that the high range one is the correct one. Which leaves me with a fairly high pH.

    Apart from testing the water for ammonia and nitrite, do I need to do anything to the tank? I read somewhere I should put fish food in?

    Thanks,

    Sofia

    #304517

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hi Sofia,

    Don’t worry about the water. It’s very common for newly set up tanks to go through a short period of cloudiness. This is caused by a bloom in microorganisms and will settle after a few days; I’d just leave it as it is.

    The pH is a bit high for some of your fish choices yes. The rams are certainly a no-no unless you can get the pH down, and I’d be tempted to ditch the cardinals, barbs and harlequins too. All of these species come from acidic waters in nature. Granted, they might survive (particularly the harlequins, but definitely not the rams) but they’ll never show their best colours. Have you tested your tap water to see if the pH is changing once inside the tank? Do you have kH and gH test kits?

    To get the tank cycling (start the nitrogen cycle off) you can indeed use fish food. It won’t be a very quick process using this system though. Other people add a few hardy fish to start the cycle off. The disadvantage here is that those fish will have to exist in less-than-ideal water conditions for a few weeks whilst the tank matures. The other main method, and one that has grown in popularity in recent years is “fishless cycling”. Try googling that phrase and see what you find.

    #304518

    Sofia
    Member

    Hi Matt,

    That is indeed me. 21 years ago

    #304520

    Sofia
    Member

    [Ok, just tested the tap water and it comes out as 7.8 so i retested the tank and it is 7.6. I think i must have misread it this morning. However, I know that this is still too high and I will see if I can get something to lower the pH.
    There were no kH or gH tests. What do they test for? I will try to get some tomorrow in the pet store as well. That is if I can get my project in on time

    #304521

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Ok I’ll try to keep this simple; basically those two tests are measures of the dissolved ionic content of your water.

    gH (general hardness) measures a bunch of different ions, but the main ones are calcium and magnesium. Results at the upper end of the scale mean there is a high level of these dissolved ions (this type of water is commonly referred to as “hard”). At the lower end there are not so many of the ions present (“soft” water). gH is important when we’re talking about the type of water a fish prefers eg. a swordtail is best kept in hard water, a cardinal tetra soft.

    kH is an abbreviation of carbonate hardness. This is the crucial measurement when considering how easy it will be to manipulate your water parameters, and also to maintain them! It measures the amount of carbonate and bicarbonate ions dissolved in the water. I won’t go into the exact chemical processes that occur, but suffice to say that at high kH levels the water is said to be well “buffered”, meaning it is comparitively difficult to change its chemical composition. At low kH levels, the opposite is true. The latter situation can actually be a detrimental one if you’re not on top of tank maintenance as if nitrates and other organic wastes are allowed to accumulate in poorly buffered water very large, rapid swings in water chemistry can occur.

    Phew, hope all that isn’t too much for you m’dear. It all seems a bit complicated at first but isn’t really.

    #304522

    Sofia
    Member

    Phew, that is a lot of information. Thanks for that quick lesson.
    I am in the south east in Thamesmead. That’s close to Woolwich.

    My boyfriend has a Brita filter. Could that potentially be used to soften my water? Aparently it removes lime scale and certain heavy metals.

    I will try to stop off in the pet sore tomorrow to get tests for kH and gH. I assume a paper test strip is enough.

    Thanks for the info

    #304523

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I think using a Brita would prove to be very expensive long-term Sofia. When you’re in the shop tomorrow, ask them if they sell RO (reverse osmosis) water. That might prove cheaper

    #304525

    Sofia
    Member

    Hi everybody. I am very confused after being in the pet store.

    I got the gH and kH liquid tests and will do those tonigh. Shall I test the tap water, or tank water or both?

    I also found a few things that lower the pH. I asked the store manager which one of them was better.
    His response was I shouldn’t waste my money, as the pH lowers itself within 2 months. However, I asked if that was true, because I would be doing water changes and hence adding the higher pH water and hence erasing all the potential decrease.
    His response to this was that I should not worry, as “no fish dies from wrong pH”.
    I am now very confused and bought the pH lowering thing anyway, as I can’t believe this to be true, as the high pH in London even gives my skin problems.

    It is a powder that reduces the water to 6.5pH. I will try that tonight as well, unless you guys tell me that the manager was right, as I would then sell it on on Ebay.

    Would the 6.5 be enough to have the Rams?

    Thanks for the help.

    Very confused beginner

    #304528

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hey Sofia. Oh dear, that guy in the shop needs to learn a few things about fishkeeping in my opinion. “No fish dies from wrong pH” eh? I’d like to see him try to maintain a Lake Tanganyika (very hard water required) community in acidic conditions, or your rams in very alkaline water. Some of his advice actually makes me mad

    #304529

    Sofia
    Member

    Hello again.

    So far the pH is lowered to 6.5, however it should not be used with live plants

    #304530

    Sofia
    Member

    Ok, 3 hours on and the result is still the same. Will test again tomorrow morning

    Good night everybody

    #304531

    dunc
    Keymaster

    QUOTE(Sofia @ Mar 11 2008, 02:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I asked the store manager which one of them was better.
    His response was I shouldn’t waste my money, as the pH lowers itself within 2 months. However, I asked if that was true, because I would be doing water changes and hence adding the higher pH water and hence erasing all the potential decrease.
    His response to this was that I should not worry, as “no fish dies from wrong pH”.


    That is utterly shocking. That kind of advice makes me feel ill. NO fishkeeper with even the mildest semblence of knowledge would suggest “no fish dies from wrong pH”. For a start it’s immensely untrue (so many south american fish which really need soft, acidic water) and even in cases where the fishes can survive, they won’t show their best colours or breed because the water isn’t acidic enough.

    Urgh I could go on but I won’t.

    Change shops ASAP.

    #304532

    dunc
    Keymaster

    Oh, just read Matt’s post.. he echoes my sentiments admirably

    Author
    Posts
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 87 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.