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Few new hillstreams

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Few new hillstreams

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #350318

    Thomas
    Participant

    Bad news, lost all Hillstreams about a bacterial infection. Can’t catch the dead out so fast as they died. I don’t know what happens, an uv-filter was installed, and all hillstreams feeds very well. Also the Lepidocephlichthys thermalis pair died, only the five L. cf. annadalei survived complete and on Gastromyzon Viriosus. 

     

    I should better stay at cobitis!

     

    Cheers,

    Thomas

     

    #350325

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    That’s terrible Thomas! Nothing new introduced to the tank?

    #350327

    Thomas
    Participant

    No, the Hillstreams from January (this thread) were the last additions

    #350330

    plesner
    Participant

    Just my 25c: My first thought as far as the source of the bacterial infection is concerned, was the red mosquito larvae. Many of them are not exactly clean and are btw. highly allergenic. By handling red mosquito larvae every now and then for about a decade, I became allergic to shrimps and other crustaceans as well as red mosquito larvae of course. Other people in the hobby have had similar experiences.

     

    I’ve also heard of several people losing entire batches of fry, because at some point they began giving them red mosquito larvae as part of their diet.

    #350331

    mikev
    Participant

    Very sorry, Thomas,

    why do you think it was bacterial? Any symptoms you saw? (IME long incubation time of a disease and no clear symptoms most likely points to a protozoan cause).

    #350334

    Thomas
    Participant

    I don’t think that it has something to do with the red m-larves, even because the two lepidocephalichthys died. If only the hillstreams dies, it sounds more possible to me. No problems or losses in the other tanks where I feed the red m-larves. But I don’t want to exclude your idea complete.

     

    Mike, I thought so. The lepidocephalichthys had reddish parts on the skin and the Balitora had reddish gills/mouth, seen when they are on the front pane of the tank.

    But ok, I’m not very familar with illness.

     

     

    #350335

    mikev
    Participant

    I’d exclude bloodworms… of course any food can in theory be a vector of infection but the chances are low. IME bloodworms from a good source are safe, I have tanks that were fed almost exclusively bloodworms for a few years with no problems… but: feeding bloodworms to smaller hillstreams actually is quite risky but for a different reason.

    I’d think still that protozoan infection is far more likely. Incubation time for bacterial infection is either very short (new fish in quarantine) or very long (TB, but then the dying pattern is different). Parasitic infections on the other hand take some time to build up and then hit with a vengeance… and some redness is probably caused by secondary infections or simply irritation by parasites. #2 guess would be internal parasites but then you would likely notice some wasting and dying would be stretched over a longer period of time.

    #350346

    Thomas
    Participant

    Thanks mike for the explanation!

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)

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