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This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Gaina 4 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 16 through 28 (of 28 total)
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  • #354400

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    “Cycling” a new aquarium can take from a couple to several weeks, depending upon several unique factors.  As you have live plants, and have used some existing filter media, you shouldn’t need to do any formal cycling.  Are you adding ammonia?

    Remember to start feeding the plants, they need nutrients to get established.

    Byron.

    #354418

    Barb Man
    Participant

    How is the tank coming? Has the fish list been solidified? If not you can look for a color you want or an area you want to mimic and pick fish from there.

    red; cherry barbs, ember tetra, ruby tetra

    blue; microgeophagus ramirezi, guppy (lots of color forms, basically any color)

    green; microdevario kubotai, green neon tetra

    orange; Boraras (they’re really small and sometimes red) guppy, endler’s livebearer, bosmani rainbowfish

    yellow; blue eyes and Celebes rainbowfish

    These are just off the top of my head if you know what color I could help better

    North America has some cool darters that are blue and/or red and shiners come in some different colors. Probably not NA though cause they arent tropical. Maybe a dwarf sunfish but they eat live only I’ve heard but they are from the Everglades and are low end tropical

    south America Cory cats and plecos along with dwarf cichlids like apistogramma and mikrogeophagus. Charcidium are like loaches. Tetra and poecilia.

    africa I’m not really sure about because most are wild caught and rarely exported. Some barbs like African fire barb or butterfly barbs I think.

    Asia has loaches betta barbs rasbora Boraras and the easiest fish to breed in my opinion white mountain minnows and they can even go non tropical if you ever went to a non heated tank. I breed some in a non heated ten gallon multiple times. They eat the fry but I had plants so some survived

    Hopefully that helps, good luck

    #354429

    Gaina
    Participant

    Hello Everyone,

     

    The tank is coming along nicely (and I love the new filter, I only know it’s running because the plants move! Haha).

     

    Byron – I’m not adding ammonia and have been feeding my plants as per the instructions from the day I got them J

     

    Barb Man – thank you so much for those suggestions, there are fish on that list I hadn’t even heard of! I am going to start with Harlequin Rasbora and try to build a community of fish that would naturally occur in the same area.

     

    Only one fly in the ointment, today I was cleaning the glass with my new magnetic cleaner and didn’t notice there was a single grain of substrate in the part of the cleaner that goes on the outside until it was too late and I have a lovely scratch on my tank! AGH! Fortunately my Dad works next door to a glazing company that may be able to help me with a solution. I’ll attach a photo of the scratch to this post. I have tried jeweller’s rouge as suggested by numerous websites but the scratch is too deep.

     

    I haven’t been able to get a full report on my water values yet but I have the latest results from my water tests I’m doing at home:

     

    PH – 7.6

    Hi PH – 8.2

    Ammonia – 0 PPM

    Nitrate – 0 PPM

    Nitrite – 5 PPM

     

    I will have had the tank 6 weeks next week so I will take some water to my local fish shop and get them to test it for an official result.2015-04-14+17.00.28.png

    #354431

    george
    Participant

    Your pH looks quite high to me. A lot of fish species, such as harlequin rasboras, prefer neutral to soft pH. 

    If you don’t mind having dark-colours water (which I find quite nice and natural looking actually), you could try popping a few dried Indian almond (catalpa) leaves or other safe leaves (https://www.seriouslyfish.com/all-the-leaves-are-brown). You could also try using peat pellets such as Eheim’s TORFpellets in your filter. That’s what I did. It got the pH down to 5 – 5.5.

    As I said, community fish usually prefer, soft acidic conditions. Many of them are tank bred and more adaptable, but they definitely will feel better in their natural water conditions and might even breed.

    #354435

    Gaina
    Participant

    @george said:
    Your pH looks quite high to me. A lot of fish species, such as harlequin rasboras, prefer neutral to soft pH. 
    If you don’t mind having dark-colours water (which I find quite nice and natural looking actually), you could try popping a few dried Indian almond (catalpa) leaves or other safe leaves (https://www.seriouslyfish.com/all-the-leaves-are-brown). You could also try using peat pellets such as Eheim’s TORFpellets in your filter. That’s what I did. It got the pH down to 5 – 5.5.
    As I said, community fish usually prefer, soft acidic conditions. Many of them are tank bred and more adaptable, but they definitely will feel better in their natural water conditions and might even breed.

    Thanks for your advice George, I don’t mind what colour the water is as long as it’s healthy and my fish are happy :).  I actually quite like the look of a ‘weak tea’ tank, it looks so natural.  Would I have to reconsider my planting options?

    I finally managed to get a water quality report but there are so many numbers and parameters it’s a bit baffling! Can you tell me the particular ones I should be looking at?

    RE PH: I am doing two separate tests for High and Normal PH ranges and I’m wondering if that’s wrong – should I just do the normal one unless it goes off that scale, in which case I’d do the High PH test?

    #354436

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

     Before jumping into water adjustment methods, let’s get the most important parameter, the GH (general hardness), and while you’re at it, the KH (carbonate hardness, or Alkalinity).  The pH is related to these, but the GH is what has the most impact on fish (soft vs hard water).  You don’t need to get a test kit; it would seem you have found the website of your local water authority so the water data likely includes GH and KH.  If you can’t decipher it, post the link and one of us can have a look.  These values do not change much in an aquarium, unless they are being specifically targeted.  Attempts to lower the pH will depend upon the GH and especially the KH; a high KH will mean minimal if any lowering of pH without major efforts to dilute the GH/KH.

    On a general note, if you get any water tests done at a fish store, ensure you ask them for the test numbers; terms like “average” are meaningless.  And on the pH, stick to one or other test, not both.  Once we know the GH and KH it will be easier to say which one, but I would suspect the normal range kit.  Also, when testing the tap water you may need to out-gas the CO2.  CO2 temporarily acidifies water, but the CO2 quickly dissipates and the pH may then show higher (more accurate).  Leave a glass of tap water sit out for 245 hours, or vigorously shake some in a covered jar for a few minutes, then test.  The resulting number will be fairly accurate.

    On the plants, they are generally less fussy over GH and pH than fish, but GH is an impoortant source of the “hard” minerals.  Once we know the numbers we can pursue this if needed.

    Byron.

    #354454

    Gaina
    Participant

    I haven’t bee at my desktop for a few days so no chance to upload the water report but as we were talking about ammonia levels the other day I wanted to mention that my ammonia levels spiked a while ago like the test kit guide book said they would. 

    #354469

    Gaina
    Participant

    Here’s the water report for my area in .pdf format.

    #354472

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    @gaina said:
    Here’s the water report for my area in .pdf format.

    I’m afraid I can’t offer much on this.  There is no reference to hardness in this report.  The conductivity is given, and this is often used as an indicator of dissolved solids in the water which includes the GH, but this is an area I have never ventured into so I would not even know where to begin to interpret.

    You could call them directly and ask for the general hardness and carbonate hardness.  A reliable fish store might do these tests; make sure you get numbers, not terms, if they do.

    Byron.
     

    #354473

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    The test kits are not expensive. And a TDS meter can be bought from ebay for $20. I wouldn’t be without either.

    #354474

    Byron Hosking
    Participant

    @plaamoo said:
    The test kits are not expensive. And a TDS meter can be bought from ebay for $20. I wouldn’t be without either.

    I have considered a TDS meter.  Living in the Vancouver region, my water is very soft (as yours likely is just a tad south of me), so I know the tap water is low (they add soda ash to raise pH but nothing else other than chlorine) and I can’t do much about the TDS I add via conditioner, plant fertilizers and food.  If I had harder water, I would definitely look into this as a priority, but here it is something I’d like to check into when money is available.

    Byron.

    #354475

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Hey neighbor! :) If you ever venture South of the border give me a shout!

    Indeed our water is soft and I find the TDS meter indispensable. If I don’t add buffers I’ll get crashes. This is the simplest way to monitor the hardness. I don’t bother much with pH anymore. Once you get a handle on your water and how it reacts to your practices this is the easiest way to check for changes. I also collect substrate and river rocks from the local rivers and I use the TDS meter to check for leeching. Many uses!

    #354524

    Gaina
    Participant

    Thanks for your help.  I shall ask about hardness when I get the test. They are very helpful and the place I go to so they should steer me in the right direction :).

    I now have a problem with cloudy water which I’ve just written a new post about.  I just want my fishies now, dagnabbit! :-P

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