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Homaloptera confuzona, questions

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Homaloptera confuzona, questions

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
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  • #351021

    olly
    Participant

    mikev said
    I actually would love to collect some lifespan data on hillies…

    It is very useful and very interesting information! Thanks! When I take the new fish for my tank, I’m always interested to know how long this fish lives. Unfortunately, it is not well known about lifespan of all hillstreams yet.
    In the case of the breeding of loaches, it is also interesting the beginning and duration of reproductive period. For example, in according to your experience the reproductive period for Homaloptera confuzona is to be approximately 3 years of 6 years of lifespan. So I have two more years to try to get fry from H.confuzona. It would be nice to know more about the “strategy”of hillstreams reproduction. For example, Cobitis taenia spawning is only once in the life, rarely twice. Their spawning in portions lasts for 3-4 months. But other species may have another pattern of the spawning activity during reproductive period: permanent, seasonal, another.
    My dream – spawning of my gastromyzons and H.confuzona, and to raise their fry.  It is a pity that nothing is known about their spawning activity, triggers of it and necessary conditions.

    mikev said
    And “more aggressive” does not always mean male with hillstreams.

    Yes, I agree with you and I have the same opinion.

    mikev said
    True for sewellia,

    I confirm this.

    #351049

    Jrp
    Participant

    Just to give my input on lifespan of some hillstream species. In my experience most do seem to live in the 6-8 year range but I have had a few surpass that. I had a Gastromyzon Ocellatus live 9 years and a Gastromyzon ctenocephalus live 10 years. Both were about an inch long when I purchased them in 2002. Presently, I have a Beaufortia kweichowensis and a Sinogastromyzon wui that I have had for 12 years. They were 2 inches long when I purchased them so I have no idea how old they are.

    #351059

    mikev
    Participant

    as a guess: sucker types are somewhat more long-living, possibly because of overall less active lifestyle, than lizards. pseudogastromyzons, however, seem to belong to ‘lizards’ here.

    #351117

    olly
    Participant


    @Jrp
    said:
    Just to give my input on lifespan of some hillstream species. In my experience most do seem to live in the 6-8 year range but I have had a few surpass that. I had a Gastromyzon Ocellatus live 9 years and a Gastromyzon ctenocephalus live 10 years. Presently, I have a Beaufortia kweichowensis and a Sinogastromyzon wui that I have had for 12 years. 

    It’s great! It is surprising that such small fishes have the potential capacity to live so long. I’d like to create optimal conditions in the tank for my hillstreams for their such long life.


    @mikev
    said:
    as a guess: sucker types are somewhat more long-living, possibly because of overall less active lifestyle, than lizards. pseudogastromyzons, however, seem to belong to ‘lizards’ here.

    Interesting guess. According to the guess it may be expected that homalopteroides (H.smithi, H.twidi ) with more calm lifestyle have a longer lifespan than more active homalopteras (for example, H.confuzona). Is anything known about the lifespan of pseudogastromyzons  and  homalopteroides? I do not know.

    #351118

    torso
    Participant

    Hi

    I don’t agree.

    The “sucker” type – who it not sucking at all – has not the possibility to build up energy reserves, due to it’s body form. They mostly look like this when coming in. As soon the structure of the carcass is visible – along the spine – they won’t survive. They are active in searching food all day. That’s by the way the reason, why the fry in a tank doesn’t get the chance to develop in the first to weeks as they do in the wild. Result: you’ll never see larger bred ones that the wild imports. I’m actually trying to bring up larger S. speciosa by daily large doses of smallest dry food – “Staubfutter”. First effect is striking: more fry than ever in spite of the fact, that hundreds of shrimps – as “user” of the resting food – are certainly getting most of the eggs. The first two youngsters are now as large as the parents when coming in.

    About lifespan: I think water qualitiy is much more important than movement pattern. Means: with an UV bypass or – generally speaking – low contamination they live longer. Given that the right food is available and t he water is not fixes at a permanent high level.

    “Agressivity”: my S. specioas female is broader and dominant. To say: is chasing all others safe the dominant male. But when he trys to chase her away he is not successful.

    A pic of the spawning, dated 18.05. 2011: it was a surprise that they started from the smaller side of the tank – normally they join on a flat stone in the tank and “fly” up. The event took some seconds and I couldn’t get a really sharp pic.

    Cheers Charles

    S.-speciosa-spawning-CSC_7715.jpg

    #351120

    Jrp
    Participant

    I do have UV sterilizers on the two tanks that have had the longest living hillstreams so that is probably a factor.

    #351122

    mikev
    Participant

    I do have UV sterilizers on the two tanks that have had the longest living hillstreams so that is probably a factor.

    the question is if there were other types of hillstreams in the same tanks (thus same water quality) that did not live this long?

    still water quality is a factor, temperature is a huge factor, but activity level also matters. More activity==>faster metabolism==>more oxidization==>faster aging. This pattern seems true for other type of fish, for instance a typical 2″ rasbora seems to live longer than a similarly sized danio. Bottom fish in general seems to live longer than top fish of the same size (consider 10-20 years for cories/killies vs 5-7 for the “dither”)

    Because of the temperature factor, one should also expect fish coming from subtropical areas (China) to live less than ones that come from tropical (Indonesia, Indochina).

    I’d love to see some data for h.smithi’s too… as a guess based on temp and behavior it should not be too bad? And what is the longest one could get from p.cheni?

    #351251

    torso
    Participant

    I’ve got some H. confuzona lately. here some pics. Semms as if one speciemen is another species, visble at the mouth form. Any ideas what it could be? So far Ihomaloptera-confuzona-DSC_2600.jpghomaloptera-confuzona-DSC_2652.jpghomaloptera-confuzona-DSC_2791.jpghomaloptera-confuzona-DSC_2792.jpghomaloptera-confuzona-DSC_2793.jpghomaloptera-confuzona-DSC_2758.jpghomaloptera-confuzona-CSC_2823.jpghomaloptera-confuzona-CSC_2820.jpghomaloptera-sp-DSC_2788.jpg couldnt pic it out o f the group.

    #351258

    mikev
    Participant

    Last photo? Mouth is different, and where are the barbels?

    #351270

    Matt
    Keymaster

    That last one is reminiscent of a H. leonardi-type fish. Perhaps we need a gallery of balitorid mouth shapes…

    #351290

    torso
    Participant

    I doubt it, Matt. But with that only profile-pic it’s not easy. Outer shape of gead seems different, mouth-form could fit, barbels as well.

    And for you, Mikev a pichomaloptera-sp-DSC_2788-02.jpg

    #351296

    mikev
    Participant

    Yes, they seem much smaller than the huge fat ones Confuzona has.

    #351300

    olly
    Participant


    @torso
    said:
    I’ve got some H. confuzona lately.

    It’s great! As for me, H. confuzona is very positive fish.

    It is interesting to see the mysterious homaloptera from the back and side.

    #351316

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Wasn’t saying it is H. leonardi, just that the mouth looks more like that species than H. confuzona. 😛

    #351319

    torso
    Participant

    Of course, Matt. It is certainly closer to H. leonardi than to H. confuzona. What is irritating: I diind’ spot a different looking specimen when they came in, the pics were taken right then and up till now I didn’t work on the pics, just stocked them. I tried to get a pic of every specimen yesterday, which is difficult or impossible without emptying out the tank. I still can’t detect a different looking specimen and can’t spot the shown specimen by a pic.

    I lost two specimen after income. May be they didn’t like the lowering of KH or were to week. All showed a certain discomfort, changed from red to brown, so I came back to the level of 6-8° KH as seen in the import. They look fine now.

    Cheers Charles

     

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