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Lake Malawi Setup

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Lake Malawi Setup

This topic contains 24 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Reva 9 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)
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  • #300681

    Reva
    Participant

    Hi guys! Due to the death of a friend, I have been gone a while, but it’s good to be back!

    After being dormant , not just here online, but just maintaining my 150gal(US)Australian Rainbow tank and my 55gal(US) Amazon tank , I have decided that a good way to become enthusiastic about something again is to start something I have not tried before.

    I have a spare 55 gallon with a Rena canister filter for up to 75gal filtration, plus I have a few extras to help with the filter, like a hot mag and an undergravel. I have been wanting to try Lake Malawi Cichlids for years, but I am the kind of person that gets all upset if bullies ruin the “zen” of the tank.
    I have been reading and think I might try
    Labidochromis caeruleus (Electric Yellow Lab)
    Aulonocara walteri (Blue Faced Peacock)
    or
    Pseudotropheus acei (Yellow Tailed Acei)

    Have any of you kept them?
    Do they mix well with each other?
    How many should I start with?
    What substrate is best?
    What about Anubia plants with them?
    Thanks for any advice!

    #317578

    johnpeten
    Participant

    This info might help.
    http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/l_caeruleus.php
    Habitat: Labidochromis caeruleus is found at pure rocky coasts at depths ranging between 10 and 50 meters. In the wild it is a very rare cichlid normally found inside caves and crevices where it searches for food on the undersides of rocks. During an hour’s dive one may not see more than two individuals. When it occurs in shallow water, it is found feeding from the ceiling of a cave. It has also been found among the weed beds in shallow water (Lewis, 1982).
    Feeding: The food consists of small crustaceans, insects, and their larvae. The teeth of Labidochromis caeruleus are long and pointed and act like pincers twisting prey out of tiny cracks and pockets in the rocky surface. Prey is located visually and the fish therefore needs to search in sediment-free environments as on sediment-covered rocks prey is virtually invisible. Labidochromis caeruleus belongs to the insectivorous section of the genus; most other Labidochromis feed on algae.

    Aulonocara sp. ‘walteri’ is endemic to Likoma and Chizumulu Island.
    Habitat: Lake Malawi pH of the water is about 8.3. The temperature of the water in Lake Malawi fluctuates with the seasons. In the dry season it can be as low as 20° C and in sheltered bays in the rainy season as high as 30° C. At Chizumulu Aulonocara sp. ‘walteri’ dwells in caves of the sediment-free rocky habitat but at Likoma it is also found in the intermediate habitat (e.g. at Membe Point). In the latter habitat its preferred depth ranges from 10 to 20 meters but in the rocky habitat it is can be observed at a depth of just a few meters.
    Feeding: Food is collected in the characteristic way seen in all Aulonocara. It consists of small invertebrates which live in the sand.
    This guy is in are own profiles.

    #317582

    johnpeten
    Participant

    Pseudotropheus sp. ‘acei’
    This one has not been described. It is one of Ad Konings fish. However it now apparently is a popular fish in the trade.
    http://www.cichlid-forum.com/profiles/species.php?id=1460

    #317591

    Reva
    Participant

    thanks John. I have been reading online about them, but was just wondering what personal experiences folks have had with them.
    The ph here is perfect (and island in the Pacific NW) for them, so tank maintenance would be easy, as well as finding live food

    #317592

    johnpeten
    Participant

    http://www.cichlidae.com/forum/viewforum.p…4fa8aedbaa3f3f9

    Lake Malawi Cichlids is a vast subject with so many genera and species. Many are undescribed although they are popular in the Aquarium trade. They are certainly beautiful fish.

    Your best bet to find personal experiences is to join the above forum.

    #317602

    Reva
    Participant

    thank you John, will try it out

    #317605

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey

    In Aquarium Gazette Issue 9 we ran two excellent articles, by a father and son, on starting with Malawi cichlids. Details are available from the website (see The Lounge posting for Issue 14 for details).

    Regards David

    #317609

    johnpeten
    Participant

    http://malawicichlids.com/

    If anybody else is interested in Lake Malawi Cichlids the above source lists 535 know species, both described and undescribed. Each species has photos and/or drawings and habitat information etc.

    As I previously mention this is a vast subject and this site should send your head pleasantly spinning.

    The Lake is 30 miles wide and therefore more like an inland sea. Discovered by David Livingstone, of course.

    Attached files

    #317619

    Reva
    Participant

    wow, very interesting!! thank you both. John that site is really fun! puzzles and everything

    #317621

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hola Reva if you’re woriied about aggression why not try a mix of more placed species like Copadichromis and the Aulonocara you already mentioned?

    #317633

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Reva

    THANK YOU

    If you introduce the two ladies, very slowly, I cannot see that the two larger Parrots doing them any harm.

    Regards David

    #317634

    johnpeten
    Participant

    I have never encountered the Parrot Cichlid during my meanderings in the Cichlid World. As curiosity had killed the cat I had to investigate. I soon discovered the reason. A manufactured fish, sometimes called the Frankenstein Fish, hybridized apparently from some of the more colourful Central American Cichlids by our Asian friends. It was said that some purists took positive action against pet stores selling them. I had visions of people marching up and down with placards stating “Ban the Frankenstein Fish”
    Oh well, our fishy world is always interesting with something new learnt as every corner is turned.

    #317636

    Matt
    Keymaster

    John, it’s almost come to that at times.

    #317639

    Reva
    Participant

    Hola Matt

    #317641

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey John

    I could not resist posting this photograph of Asian Red Parrot Cichlids and friends.

    Not really Frankenstein Fish but very delightful hybrid cichlids.

    You will not be surprised to hear that I am writing an article on these fish for Aquarium Gazette.

    Hey Reva

    I think you will like this photograph.

    When introducing your females place them, one at a time, into a glass container so that the males can see them. Watch the reaction of the males and if this looks like one of joy then release the female(s) to join them. If the males show anger then try again another day. In all honesty I cannot see, knowing Parrots, any problem.

    Regards David

    Attached files

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