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Preliminary Experiences With Rhinogobius zhoui

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Preliminary Experiences With Rhinogobius zhoui

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 106 total)
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  • #347401

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Matt, I can not observe that the fin shape has an influence on the dominance. It seems to have no influence on behavior, as far as I can see. When my youngest is a little bigger though, I’ll probably have to correct again, for it has extremely large dorsal fin and has now already the greatest mouth of all, and measuring just 3.5 cm 🙂

    I will even try to explain what I thought was pursued: Dietzenbach got a few months ago a large shipment R. zhoui. The animals were in extremely poor condition, which permits the inference, that the catchers the animals in small amounts in different places (probably within a limited area) have trapped and collected. This catchers, unfortunately, tend to the animals, that were first caught, not to feed and no water to change. This often means that the animals arrive malnourished, with worms and with completely eroded fins. This is usually an indication that the animals were collected at different locations over a long period.

    In these animals, I could just make up different fin shapes. But I have not attached great importance, because now I see with my offspring also, that they form very different sized fins. I put that back in the wild captured in different locations and nutritional status.

    #347402

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hi Jutta, ok so would it be fair to say we’re talking about different populations, but we don’t know how geographically separated they are, and we have no idea which fish are from what population?

    Thanks for the info by the way, it’s all very interesting.

    #316428

    Ferrika
    Participant

    I’m starting to really lose the nerves with this critters.

    Since they began back to spawn in March, I do better than last year, the nest to fanning from the first day and not to lose so many eggs. So I have spent the last weeks a nest with 24 eggs and one with 54 eggs brought to the eclosion, while max. each 10 eggs lost.

    BUT …. After hatching, the larvae die like flies. It makes me crazy because I do not know what I can do yet. The larvae began to be white from the brain, and then this migrates along the spine, until the animal is completely dead.

    I had been to assume, that this concerns a bacterial infection, because the larvae for a long time motionless lying on the floor. That’s why I run a small pump, that continuously stirs the larvae. But that did not help.

    Also, constant changes of water, medicines for bacterial infections, experiments with the temperature and disinfection does nothing improve.

    Now a new attempt comes with a spawning grid, so that the larvae are no longer in contact with the ground …. and the water will to be hardened to 7 ° dH. Keep me fingers crossed, that survive the next clutch more than 8 animals ….

    #314459

    Ferrika
    Participant

    So, now I seem to have won.
    The last clutch, wherein so many larvae have died, I have used for an experiment. I have used a drug that is commonly used for garden ponds and in fact is not without risk. But when the larvae die anyway, then it can only get better, not make it worse.

    The infection was actually stopped. However, some larvae are severely damaged by the infection, can not hold the head straight and not coordinated swimming. I’ll probably have to kill them.

    In the next clutch I have used the drug during the development of the eggs. The results were amazing. The larvae are hatched uniform (within 48 hours, not as before within 5 days) and their yolk sacs are within only 4 days so far receded that they were able to dash around and already ate. This time only 4 larvae are died. 🙂

    The question arises: the previous larvae / clutch actually had a brain infection that has delayed their development? Gave the wrong signals to the slip?

    The next clutch is now in development. I’m curious if there will show the same result. In the moment, I have 31 bouncy pups and I’m also curious if the total will develop more quickly.

     

    zhoui-tag6.jpg

    #314460

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hi Jutta very good news! Is the chemical an anti-bacterial agent then?

    #314064

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Yes, Matt, fungal, bacterial and various other things. It is called in Germany F-M-G.

    #346450

    torso
    Participant

    Hi

    FMC right, Jutta?

    It consists of formaldehyde (formol) at 37-40%, chloramphenicole (chloromycetin), methylene blue, malachit-green-oxalate. Mesurements are: 1 lt formol, 2 g chloramphenicole, 3.7 g  methylene blue and 3.7 g malachit-green-oxalate (without zink)

    Dosis: 1 ml/100 lt or slightly more

    A very powerful mixture and sometimes the last hope against Staphylococcus aureus affecting live-bearers.

    One advantage is: it doesn’t create resistences as far as I know. Disadvantages: not easy to measure out, you never know if it kills the fish.  And methylene blue is inking all blue like hell (highly hygroscopic)

    Cheers Charles

    #313966

    Ferrika
    Participant


    @torso
    said:
    Hi

    FMC right, Jutta?

    One advantage is: it doesn’t create resistences as far as I know. Disadvantages: not easy to measure out, you never know if it kills the fish.  And methylene blue is inking all blue like hell (highly hygroscopic)

    Cheers Charles

    Yes, thats right, Charles. I know about the risk and have measured very carefully. 3 drops on 10 litres are enough to stop the infect. No daphnia or snails die, thats a good sign.

    And yes, its inking like hell!

    #313242

    pablito
    Participant

    Have just collected 3 pairs of these little stunners. I chose black males which were different to some of the males in the collection. The pictures posted in an earlier by Ferrika depict the colours of the other males and all of the females. As soon as they settle I’ll get a pic done and posted. The black/chocolate colouration is a lot prettier in my view.:D

    #311962

    Ferrika
    Participant

    I’m so proud of the current generation. The youngest are now three weeks old and they grow just great.

    The day before yesterday have hatched from a clutch of originally 71 eggs slightly more than 60 pups. So far no losses. The little ones are only three days old, but already up bouncing and eat well. So I like this breed again 🙂

     

    The youngsters….

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The fresh babies

     

    #311888

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Beautiful Jutta! What are you feeding them?

    #311891

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Brine shrimp nauplii, Jim.

    #312079

    Matt
    Keymaster

    60 from 71 eggs is a fantastic rate, do they take Artemia nauplii immediately once the yolk sac is gone Jutta?

    #311810

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Matt, already long before that. The yolk sac is about on 6 days used up completely, but they eat as early as the 2nd day.

    #348089

    Ferrika
    Participant

    A pic from today. Matt, here you can see the yolk sac before the stomach. The white ball in front of the yolk sac, the yellow-orange behind it is the stomach filled with Artemia.

    The little ones are grown well a millimeter since yesterday 🙂

    zhoui-tag4-3.jpgzhoui-tag4-1.jpgzhoui-tag4-2.jpg

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