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pygmy corydoras

Home Forums My Aquarium pygmy corydoras

Viewing 3 posts - 16 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #349843

    george
    Participant

    oh I do understand cycling. My tank is fully cycled. I don’t understand what matt meant by cycling/maintenance regime. Water changes? Filter medium?

    #349845

    Eyrie
    Participant

    “Cycling” is the process described in the link Matt provided whereby sufficently large colonies of bacteria are grown in the filter to reduce the potentially lethal ammonia produced by the fishes’ natural metabolic processes to relatively harmless nitrAte which can be removed as part of your maintenance regime.

     

    Your maintenance regime should involve a weekly test of the tank water for ammonia, nitrIte and nitrAte, followed by a water change of approximately 20-25%, although the presence of either ammonia or nitrIte in an aquarium with fish present will mean that you should do a larger change and an additional check and change each day until both are nil.

     

    At each water change it is always a good idea to clean the filter media (ie the contents of the filter box which are typically sponges or ceramic rings) in the tank water which you have just removed.  This should always be done for the first stage of the filter which is usually a floss pad as this will quickly accumulate crud which impedes the flow of water into the filter.  That flow is necessary to ensure that the bacteria living in the media get the ammonia and oxygen they need to survive.

     

    The filter media should never be replaced unless it is literally falling to pieces as you would be removing those bacteria.  The pre-filter floss can be changed every few months providing you keep it clean in between.

     

    The tank should then be topped back up using dechlorinated tap water and the easiest way to do this is to add the dechlorinator to the bucket, then fill the bucket with tap water.  The dechlorinator takes almost immediate effect and the fresh water can be added to the tank.  Failing to use dechlorinator means that the chlorine/chloramine present in tap water to make it safe to drink will kill the very bacteria you need to keep the tank healthy for fish (which brings us back to the cycle).

     

    Hope that clarifies what’s required, but just ask if there’s anything that you’re not sure about.  It’s better to learn from our mistakes (and everyone has made some!) than to make your own.

    #349848

    george
    Participant

    Thank you. That helps a lot. 

    Do you know how to lower water hardness? I have a small issue with that.

Viewing 3 posts - 16 through 18 (of 18 total)

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