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Questions On Rasbora

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Questions On Rasbora

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 140 total)
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  • #312983

    Matt
    Keymaster

    R. taeniata is currently listed as a junior synonym of both agilis and pauciperforata so it certainly seems that might be the case David.

    I don’t know what to do about agilis now. It seems it is the same species as pauciperforata and I don’t really see the point in having two information pages for the same fish! Also the agilis one would clearly be without images too. I’m still tempted to omit it because if anyone seacrhes for agilis in the database they’ll immediately be taken to the pauciperforata profile anyway where I was planning to explain all…

    Has anyone ever seen R. aurotaenia in the trade? Considering deleting that species altogether for now as I just can’t find any information anywhere.

    #312984

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Matt

    I have seen a fish identified to me as Rasbora aurotaenia in the hobby. You have confusion here also as, if my memory is correct, R. retrodorsalis is considered by some a synonym of a. whereas others consider this fish (The Mekong Rasbora) as a valid specie.

    Anyway R. aurotaenia is known as the Gold-stripe Rasbora. Max. length 6″. I think it is found in Thailand and areas of the Mekong?

    The fish I remember seeing as R.a was very similar to a Scissortail except that it had much more of a green sheen to the belly area. I remember distinctly that when the show tank in which this fish was held was moved into an area of natural light the green area glowed like an emerald. I have seen similar colour in other Rasbora species, and fellow cyprinids, but never seen anything to match this beauty

    Regards David

    #312987

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Sounds a beautiful fish David cheers.

    #312991

    David Marshall
    Participant

    Hey Matt

    You have hit on another large scope subject.

    Only Rasbora I have ‘bred’ is the Harlequin. This was easy as the parents spawned, on the underside of a lead, without any coaxing or pre-spawning feeding requirements etc. Sadly I was unable to remove the leaf in time to save the eggs.

    Rasbora’s will spawn in more than one way. Some need specific pH’s and temperature. Others only spawn at certain times of the year. Gerry Hawksby always tells me that egg production in females is at a premium in the months March to May.

    Very little but hope it helps.

    Regards David

    #312994

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    Matt – I have a nagging suspicion that Emma may well have just got some R. aurotaenia in, I have seen them and couldn’t get them when I was down last but will be picking some up soon.

    There is a picture of them here, now I think from the descriptions I have read and the only couple of specimens I have seen that these could be juvenile R. aurotaenia, I good be way off but I just have this nagging thought that they are.

    When I have spawned borapatensis, trilineata and elegans in the past I used a long shallow tank with the plastic spawning mats laid on the bottom, add the adults when the females are about ready to pop, add flow from one end at the surface and add cool water to the tank every few hours bringing the level up slowly and pretty much stop feeding apart from small amounts of black midge larvae, remove adults after a couple of days when eggs have been dropped and replace power filter with sponge filter and wait for fry to hatch.

    Me and Mick were talking down at Emma’s about spawning the bigger Rasbora’s and I think his idea was pretty similar.

    #312997

    Matt
    Keymaster

    That is fantastic info Mark cheers. When you say a “long” tank how long do you mean for say a small species like borapetensis? How long after hatching do Rasbora fry become free swimming?

    I saw that thread on Petfrd yeah those look like beautiful little fish. It’d be great if they did turn out to be aurotaenia but for now I think we’ll keep the profile offline pending pics.

    Incidentally I have a strong suspicion we’ll be discussing that Fang paper before long as danionins are next up after Rasbora

    #312998

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Mar 17 2009, 03:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    That is fantastic info Mark cheers. When you say a “long” tank how long do you mean for say a small species like borapetensis? How lonmg after hatching do Rasbora fry become free swimming?

    I used to use 30″x12x12″ and a 36″x12″x12″ tanks for spawnings.

    Depends on species and temperatures Matt, if you start raising the temps as soon as eggs are laid hatching can take place after 18 to 48 hours, the young look just like tiny slivers of glass and absorb the yolk sac over 24 to 48 hours and will then take infusoria followed by newly hatched brine shrimp.

    I used to follow the newly hatched brine shrimp with cyclops and daphnia after a couple of weeks.

    QUOTE (Matt @ Mar 17 2009, 03:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Incidentally I have a strong suspicion we’ll be discussing that Fang paper before long as danionins are next up after Rasbora/laugh.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:lol:” border=”0″ alt=”laugh.gif” />

    #312999

    Matt
    Keymaster

    I wouldn’t blame you like!

    #313000

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    R. caudimaculata – very placid and quite quick growing compared to other large Rasbora species, mine were added to the 7ft while only around 1.5″ and even though in a group of 10 along with a large group of other Rasboras they were quite skitty and I have since lost all 10 due to them jumping out of the tank, some of which got through gaps that were to small to get the dead fish back through.

    Eat pretty much anything but plenty of bloodworm help keep the tail nice and red.

    R. wijnbergi (meinken 1963) and R. dorsimaculata (Herre 1937) were two names given to juvenile specimens of R. caudimaculata due to some juveniles having a black tip to dorsal and larger black tips to caudal.

    #313001

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Mark do you know if it’s restricted to Borneo?

    #313002

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    As far as I know Malaya Peninsula, Sumatra and Borneo.

    #313003

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Man I knew this genus was going to mash my head; FB report it from the lower Mekong in Cambodia which I had a hunch was wrong.

    I presume the following fish to be pauciperforata. It seems that the lateral stripe can vary in colour in this species then? Is that a locality thing?

    Attached files

    #313004

    Mark Duffill
    Participant

    Yeah that’s pauciperforata the lateral stripe can be very variable often down to what the fish is eating, in spawning condition and even how comfortable it feels in the tank, I have found that fish in heavily planted tanks show better colour.

    That black line under the red stripe can also be variable, also the more mature the specimen the more the black flecks on the belly area show.

    #313008

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Ah I see, thanks for clearing that up mate.

    #313009

    mickthefish
    Participant

    it’s adaptable mate, in my tanks when i kept them i tried not to let the PH and hardness go down to low.
    mine were kept at between 7 & 7.5 and they grew well and had good colour, but they need a decent amount of swimming room so a 4 ft tank would be the minimum i would keep this species.

    mick

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