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Questions on Rhinogobius

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Questions on Rhinogobius

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 122 total)
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  • #349536

    Ferrika
    Participant

    He is only 5.5 cm. A handsome guy, huh? ;-)

    #349583

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Yes, wonderful, and fits the diagnostics for R. nantaiensis very closely!

    #349743

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Quick update. Rhinogobius profiles have been temporarily put on hold due to all the recent changes in loach taxonomy, but almost caught up now!

    Also managed to get a copy of what seems to be the most recent redescription of R. duospilus (Wu, 1991) which is in Chinese so will attempt to get it translated asap.

    We have images of a number of species which are labelled ‘sp. OR’, ‘sp. AB’, etc. Any opinions as to whether these should go into the database as well?

    #349748

    Ferrika
    Participant

    If you have the translation for the R. duospilus, could I please get a copy of it?

    What the spp. concern: maybe you could respond to the fact that there are many types on the market that look like R. duospilus, but are not. A few of them I can identify, but not many. If I get to see the images, can I look over it, if you like.

    Perhaps one can describe also times an example, what are the distinguishing characteristics? (Branchio Stegalmembran, gill covers, tail, side drawing, etc.)

    #349754

    HDP
    Participant

    Hi,

    Ferrika said 

    Second the risk of hybridization is at the R. candidianus only with R. cf. nantaiensis and possibly with R. cf. henchuenensis. 

     

    Jutta is there literature out there on the hybridization behaviour of Rhinogobius spp.?

    I am asking because I ordered a group of R. candidianus which arrived here (as a mix of different species of course) and was separated into two groups. Afterwards I realized that one group spawned and the other not. The spawning group consists only of R. candidianus while in the other group male specimen of R. cf. nantaiensis and females of R. candidianus where mixed up. The females just don’t seem to be interested in the males. After having bought another group I finally found a slightly smaller female which upon put together with the R. cf. nantaiensis males would spawn. 

    Cheers Heiko

    #349755

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Heiko, so far I do not know about it and there is no literature on this topic. That’s why I wrote it that I see this risk there.
    I know for example, that my duospilus-like do not mate with each other. And although e.g. R. giurinus posing with all the same size Rhinogobius, they never come up with the idea of going further.
    Rather, I believe that the risk of hybridization is very low. But I would not with the R. candidianus / nantaiensis my hand put into the fire.

    #349762

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Jutta, as soon as I have a translation I’ll send to you of course. :)

    Will put photos up here as we work through them. Some of the unidentified species are actually labelled with combinations of letters by scientists so think it will be a case of including them lilke that or not at all?

    #349768

    Ferrika
    Participant

    @Matt said:

    Some of the inidentified species are actually labelled with combinations of letters by scientists so think it will be a case of including them lilke that or not at all?

    This only affects the brunneus complex, Matt. Although I often think of these, it could also simply be variants location. Unfortunately I have not yet had from these animals here. (Up in a way that looks like a mixtures of henchuenensis and nantaiensis, which I can not identify), so I can hardly make statements about.

    In the duospilus-like there is something better. There are precise characteristics, to which one can orient themselves and which, in conjunction with corresponding paper, can lead the way to a certain species.

     

    #350909

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Still planning to return to Rhinogobius soon – will try to upload some pics of duospilus-type fish this week.

    For now just wondering if anyone has experience of rhinos predating smaller fish? The R. rubromaculatus seem to take a bite at anything added to their tank and today one of them tried to eat, and killed, a fully-grown Aphanius. 😕

    #350913

    mikev
    Participant

    rhinogobius giurinus of course. When I kept them, I did not have other fish in the tank, so they were only killing each other… I finally gave up, gave them to friend, and they first molested a pleco (he did not mind that), then took a bit from a 2″ rainbow…

    Interesting about rubros… mine don’t even chase each other much.

    #350916

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Sometimes my duospilus-collection eat some little, newborn guppies. But neither my R. rubromaculatus nor the R. giurinus are predators for other fishes.

    At this time I’ve only one R. giurinus male. He is living in a 50 x 50 x 30 tank. In this I  inserted a group of very young and small A. nesolepis on saturday (about 1 to 2 cm). All nesolepis are living, the giurinus didn’t eat some of them.

    If you insert new fishes into a goby-tank, please take the new fishes for at least 24 hours into a net, until the smell of the new fishes has adapted to the tank. Then the gobies will them not longer see as food. (And, of course, the gobies must been feeded well with live or freeze food).

    Perhaps the gobies do this sometimes when they have a specific nutrient deficiency? My get their daily dose of enriched nauplii. Perhaps that is why they so peaceful?

    #350919

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Thanks guys. Jutta, I will do that with the net from now on.

    If they have a nutrient deficiency I wonder what it could be? They seem fat and healthy and am pretty sure they’re laying eggs regularly, too. Diet is a combination of frozen stuff (bloodworm, Mysis, glassworm) plus live Daphnia and mosquito larvae from the terrace pools.

    #350921

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Matt, that’s just a theory. I am always amazed about the fact that my gobies are so peaceful compared to other animals and other holders always comes back to such incidents. Then I wonder what the differences are.

    My animals are very regularly and always at the same time fed. It is noticeable to me that they stop eating when they’re full. Even from the live food often remain residues. And outside this feeding time they take almost no notice of food.

    May play also this “knowledge” that there are regularly food a role in their peaceful?

     

    apropos: I have ordered from the supplier in the UK (http://www.zmsystems.co.uk/index.php?app=gbu0&ns=prodshow&ref=Hufa100), after you have once asked some time ago. Very good quality, very reliable delivery! It’s worth it!

    #350922

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Well it’s certainly an interesting theory. Maybe it’s significant that they did this after I returned from the Turkey trip so hadn’t been fed for 10 days or so although they had been fed each day last week.

    About R. nantaiensis, think I will remove the cf. so that it is the same as your site – this should help avoid confusion.

    Also, first round of photos for id. I guess some were already identified by you but just to check. Smile

    R. leavelli?

    Rhinogobius-leavelli-011.jpg

    R. duospilus-type fish 1

    Rhinogobius-duospilus-male.jpg

    Rhinogobius-duospilus-male-3.jpg

    R. duospilus-type fish 2

    Rhinogobius-duospilus-male-1.jpg

    R. duospilus-type fish 3

    Rhinogobius-cf-xianshuiensis.jpgRhinogobius-cf-xianshuiensis-2.jpg

    #350923

    Ferrika
    Participant

    Maybe it’s significant that they did this after I returned from the Turkey trip so hadn’t been fed for 10 days or so although they had been fed each day last week.

    No wonder, they’ve been hungry!

     

    Ok,

    1. pic = Rhinogobius leavelli (offspring from me Wink )

    2. pic = Rhinogobius ponkouensis

    3. pic = Rhinogobius nandujiangensis (the original)

    4. pic = Rhinogobius cf. nandujiangensis

    5. – 6. pic = Rhinogobius cf. nandujiangensis (offspring from me Smile)

     

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 122 total)

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