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Sewellia spp.

Home Forums Fresh and Brackish Water Fishes Sewellia spp.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 107 total)
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  • #321072

    Matt
    Keymaster

    According to both Roberts and Freyhof/Serov Sewellia spp. have 1 simple and 19-26 branched pectoral rays.

    #321075

    Menu
    Participant

    It is very interesting that my S.sp. looks different from underside.
    Especially the mouth region is quite different.



    I dont think that they are P.fasciatus the body shape is much more extended.
    http://www.loaches.com/species-index/pseud…myzon-fasciatus

    #321076

    The.Dark.One
    Participant

    QUOTE (Menu @ Jan 29 2011, 05:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I dont think that they are P.fasciatus the body shape is much more extended.

    Hi Menu – no, I didn’t meant these, I meant the ‘Beaufortia’ described in the Vietnam books look like P. fasciatus. Have you got any closer high resolutions pics from underneath so we can count the unbranched pectoral fin rays? The ons here are not close or clear enough.

    Matt – that is also my understanding in terms of the 1 unbranched pectoral fin rays (as mentioned before).

    #321077

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    QUOTE
    Have you got any closer high resolutions pics from underneath so we can count the unbranched pectoral fin rays? The ons here are not close or clear enough.


    They’re still not cooperating but this is alittle better.

    And a little better.

    #321101

    torso
    Participant

    exellent shots, Jim
    according to the drawings of JF/pics of Roberts: certainly not breviventralis or elongata.
    a new species…
    Nguyen: some reflections. he published a large work in Vietnamese -which no specialised ichthyologist can read; that means, even if the descriptions are scientifically ok and valid, a validation in the scientific use is out of reach; seems a strange tactic to me. second the pure qualitiy of the pictures – as reported – which makes a use for the “practical” work impossible. on the other hand: such a large work must have had the intention to be a scientific one, I cant imagine, that it wasn undertaken without the knowledge of the current literature. that means: a procedure without respecting scientific standards would have been – scientifically – suicide. in other words: I m convinced that there are new species described – although not in a adequate manor.
    and: five years after the publishing no sign by Nguyen? that s more than strange.
    what does the ichthyologist think about that?
    next week I should finally get some of the new sewellia sp and pseudogastromyzon lineatus (whatever it may be) to have a closer look.
    cheers Charles

    #321117

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Great pics Jim – based on those I’d hazard a tentative guess at Sewellia judging by the mouth shape and pelvic fin morphology (last two pelvic rays appear to form a ‘pelvic valve’ vs. fused at base in Beaufortia).

    Here are some ventral shots of B. kweichowensis from HW and Charles for comparison:

    Attached files

    #321118

    The.Dark.One
    Participant

    I would say too that they are Sewellia.

    torso – the books are indeed intended to be scientific, and the descriptions the same. They do meet the requirements of ICZN so the new descriptions are validly described. However, they are full of misedentifications, multiple spelling of new names, potential synonyms etc. I corresponded with Maurice Kottelat when they first came out, in fact I assisted him in tracking down copies of them so he could do whatever he needed.

    I think at some point we may see a large paper on them by someone as there will need to be first reviser spelling choices, synonymising etc

    #321121

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Cool, so I’ll list it as a fifth unidentified Sewellia for now then.

    #321152

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Kamphol was very helpful indeed and says the fish with orange/yellow fin borders was collected from the S. elongata type locality and appears to match that species morphologically hence the identification. I checked the revisions and it does seem to key out correctly. Here are some new pics of it from him which he’s given permission for us to use:

    Attached files

    #321155

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Having seen those pics I sent some of Jim and Manuel’s fish to Kamphol and he confirmed that they’re juvenile S. elongata collected by him with the ones above monster 8 cm adults! Here are some of the young ‘uns in the stock tanks at his place:

    Attached files

    #321156

    torso
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Feb 1 2011, 11:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Having seen those pics I sent some of Jim and Manuel’s fish to Kamphol and he confirmed that they’re juvenile S. elongata collected by him with the ones above monster 8 cm adults! Here are some of the young ‘uns in the stock tanks at his place

    that s good news,
    so Roberst didn t have adult material?

    #321157

    Matt
    Keymaster

    Hmm I guess he did – the largest specimen in the type series was 70.7 mm (doesn’t specify SL or TL). What do you think Charles?

    #321164

    torso
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Feb 1 2011, 11:33 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Hmm I guess he did – the largest specimen in the type series was 70.7 mm (doesn’t specify SL or TL). What do you think Charles?

    just a detail: when do they change to adult pattern and colouring.
    large could mean at the size of spotted – 7,5 cm? would be the size of Robert s speciemen. and that means: do they grow larger and change then? something that Kamphol would know=size of the specimen he took pics of

    #321174

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    Great info Matt! These fish are going to need a bigger tank! I was guessing these came from Kampol. I know my distributor gets shipments from him.

    #321179

    Menu
    Participant

    Thanks for the interesting information!
    So far I have seen two shipments of about 400 specimens but none was bigger than 6cm.
    Apparently no adult specimens are imported to us. The same problem as with the Gastromyzon.
    But why??
    It would be really interesting in what size they are change the color.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 107 total)

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