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Tank Photography; Need A Few Pointers

Home Forums The Lounge Tank Photography; Need A Few Pointers

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Plaamoo 8 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #301621

    Stefan
    Member

    I always stink at making good tank photos but see lots of people out there making excellent ones. Does anyone have a few pointers for me?

    #344779

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    What equipment are you using Stefan?

    #344780

    Stefan
    Member

    Good point! Canon 400D, Canon EF 24-105 L lens, Sigma 105mm macro lens – that’s all I have for now.

    #344781

    a.d.wood
    Participant

    Without any additional flash guns or studio lights you a relying on the naturally available light (room and tank lights) which will probably result in blurred images as you will be using a relatively low shutter speed.

    One way round this is to increase the ISO setting on the camera as that will let you work with a faster shutter speed allowing you to capture crisp images of the fish as well.

    As with all things it’s a compromise, nice low ISO settings give nice ‘fine grain’ images but the more you increase the ISO setting the more the ‘noise’ will be visible in the image. It’s a case of finding what the (slowest) shutter speed (and widest aperture) that you can get away with and adjusting the ISO setting to give good illumination at those settings.

    You then also have the fun of reflections (eg from windows and lights) on the glass!!

    Andrew

    #344782

    Stefan
    Member

    So it would be better to wait until I’ve got flash units?

    #344786

    torso
    Participant

    QUOTE (Stefan @ Aug 1 2011, 10:29 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    So it would be better to wait until I’ve got flash units?

    exactly.
    I work with manuel foscusing because the camera went down and was damaged. that works. but without flash no good pics. at present I work with 1/80, aperture 12-26 depending on the light sources of the tanks and ISO 80.
    and another point: most tanks are made with float glass. it depends on the quality of the process of production how far the blurry-effect works. some tanks I have only give a good result when photographing in an right angle to the front glass. only professionel constructers use an optical glass for the front. the difference is stunning.

    #344787

    Stefan
    Member

    Thanks guys! I’ll hold off until then, then

    #344789

    torso
    Participant

    QUOTE (Stefan @ Aug 1 2011, 11:40 AM) < {POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Most of my tanks are Juwel, if that helps?

    Juwel uses thinner glasses than usual and they have no glass traverse. the problems of stability are solved with the fix plastic frames. that’s why the tanks shouldn’t be put on a soft underlayment.
    thinner glasses means less reflections and more possibilities of taking pics in an sharper angle.
    if the glasses are clean …

    #344790

    Plaamoo
    Participant

    I’d echo what’s been said so far Stefan. Clean glass & clean water are the simple pointers. It can make quite a difference if you shoot after a water change when the water is crystal clear.
    An external flash will make all the difference, though I have managed some fair shots with the pop-up flash on the camera. Your 105 macro is the obvious choice but I don’t know if your on camera flash will be powerful enough to get past it? You may have to use the shorter lens. Experiment & see what you get. You can minimise the reflections with a slight angle downward. Too much angle will distort the image. Also get as close to the glass as you can with the lens, even touching it.
    I always shoot manual mode and manual focus most of the time. I get better shots. It will depend somewhat on the efficiency of your lens’ focusing motor. I typically shoot iso 200(the lowest this camera allows), f 22, 1/200 of a sec.
    One trick I’ve learned is too focus once on the fish, then move yourself in & out to fine tune as the fish move rather than using the focus ring. Much easier & quicker.
    Lots of practice with your equipment to find what works for you and many shots to get 1 good one. Enjoy, and get that flash!

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