LOGIN

RSS Facebook Twitter YouTube
GLOSSARY       

SEARCHGLOSSARY

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PROFILESEARCH

Eyrie

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 563 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: My 75L and stocking advice #351961

    Eyrie
    Participant

    A follow up to Jakub’s point about the number of males. 

    I had three male Nannostomus beckfordi and seven females in my 60L q-tank recently and the males were constantly sorting out the dominance order.  Once the quarantine period was over and I could move them into the 400L this stopped almost immediately. The ten fish still keep a loose shoal, so I’d say space is a consideration for more than just stocking levels.

    in reply to: Nitrate Problems #351884

    Eyrie
    Participant

    It’s always a good idea to have a small filter suitable for the q-tank running in the main tank so that it’s ready for use when you buy new fish or identify an illness with existing stock.

     

    in reply to: Tank stocking level #351788

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Welcome!

    Can I ask how you cycled the tank before introducing the cherry barbs?  There’s a vast difference between allowing the water to stand for a few days, adding a “bacteria in a bottle”  product and carrying out a fishless cycle with ammonia.

    The first option will give a zero reading for ammonia and nitrIte but only because there is no source of ammonia until the fish are introduced.  Bacteria in a bottle products can be hit and miss.  This leaves the fishless cycle which is the best way to prepare a new aquarium before introducing fish.  SF has a good article here which explains what’s involved (I may be biased though!)

    If the aquarium has only been left to stand then the bacteria colonies that are needed to process the ammonia can’t get started until the fish are introduced.  The result is daily water changes to prevent the ammonia and nitrIte reaching levels which are harmful and eventually fatal to the fish. 

    If you’ve used a bottled product or completed a proper fishless cycle then you would be able to look at adding more fish after three or four weeks.  However before adding any more fish it’s important that you get your own test kits so that you can monitor the readings for ammonia and nitrite when the new additions arrive and ensure that you do any required water changes whilst waiting for the bacteria colonies to multiply to cope with the additional stocking (doesn’t take long).

    I appreciate there’s a fair bit to take in, particularly when you were only looking for some stocking advice, but from experience it’s always best to get confirmation that the tank is ready for more fish before commenting on the potential additions.

    in reply to: Is my tank overstocked? #351729

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Your stocking is fine and indeed there is some room to increase numbers.  Both the rummy noses and cardinals do better in larger numbers, so I’d suggest ten of each.

    in reply to: SF Survey #351082

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Completed.  Hope it helps.

    in reply to: Happy Birthday Matt #350616

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Happy birthday, young man!

    in reply to: Testing Kit #350066

    Eyrie
    Participant

    I’d do the 50% changes daily, or even twice daily until the ammonia reading is under control.  Although the tank is newly set up, I’d expect to see nitrIte by this stage so am slightly puzzled by the nil reading in your first post in this thread.

     

    Looking at your other threads, can you confirm that the original filter is still in place and that you didn’t change it?  Also how are you getting on with cleaning the gravel?

    in reply to: Testing Kit #350058

    Eyrie
    Participant

    First suggestion – a 50% water change

    Second suggestion – another 50% water change

    Third suggestion – yet another 50% water change

     

    The reason for all those water changes is the toxic level of ammonia present in your tank which will be harming the fish.  Three consecutive 50% water changes will dilute this to about 0.35ppm, which isn’t safe yet but at least will reduce the damage the ammonia causes.  A series of water changes is preferable to a simple 80-90% change as the water chemistry in the tank will be brought in line with that from the tap gradually rather than in one fell swoop, which can cause problems of its own.  Obviously the water to be added each time will need to be brought up to temperature and dechlorinated before it can be added.  And don’t touch the filter during these changes.

     

    Next, stop feeding for a few days.  The fish will survive without food, but if they’re not eating then the ammonia that they are producing will be minimal.  When you resume feeding, feed lightly even although the fish will act hungry.

     

    By this stage we should be able to help establish why your tank has an ammonia reading but no nitrIte or nitrAte.  It could be because the tank is newly set up, has a new filter, or the filter media has been cleaned in tank water.  Whatever the reason, your tank is lacking the necessary bacteria to cope with the fish waste and it takes time to build the colonies up.  There’s more information in our fishless cycling article about what is needed.

    https://www.seriouslyfish.com/cycling-an-aquarium/

     

    As Oaken has indicated, the more information we have about your tank then the easier it is to help.  And ask if there’s anything you’re not sure about.

    in reply to: First tank cleaning #350032

    Eyrie
    Participant

    The mechanical part of the filter is the first part that collects the crud.  It will turn grey or brown over time but as long as it is free from obstructions it will continue to do the job.  A three pack will last you well over a year as you only need to replace the cartridge when there are holes present.

    Having googled the Aqueon Quietflow, it’s the bit the manual refers to as stage one dense floss.  The activated carbon at stage two can be removed and replaced with a sponge and the main part of the filtration takes place at stage three “Patented Bio-holster”.  Parts two and three should be washed only in old tank water to preserve the bacteria.

    A 25% change each week would be fine, but I suggested a 50% weekly change because this will make it easier to collect the disturbed crud. There is no issue here providing it is done every week.  If not, then two 30% changes on consecutive days will have a similar end effect and allow you to return to the 50% changes. 

    As regards the filter, I’d stick with the 100GPH which you have at present.  Just make sure that it circulates all of the water and not just the upper part of the tank.

    in reply to: First tank cleaning #350021

    Eyrie
    Participant

    The filter media should never be replaced as this is where the cycle bacteria that break down the fish waste are found.  All you need to do is give the mechanical pre-filter (typically a floss or fine cotton-type pad) a rinse each week in old tank water to avoid it getting blocked and hindering the flow of water through the filter.  The other parts of the filter can get a similar treatment every 2-3 months, but only using old tank water and never tap water.

     

    As regards the problem of keeping the gravel clean, I’d start by reducing the depth to only a couple of centimetres/one inch.  You can then stir the gravel at each change to disturb the trapped crud and get this into the water column where you can vac it out as part of your change.  You’ll need to watch how much you feed to avoid building up excess waste collecting in the gravel.

     

    The plants and rocks can be cleaned weekly if they’re easy to remove so that you keep on top of the job, or only when they start to look dirty.  Again, I’d use old tank water as a matter of routine for this.

     

    Lastly although the tank is 15G there is no issue with you doing a weekly change of seven gallons rather than four, and the larger change will make it easier to collect that disturbed crud I mentioned earlier.  The main concern with larger changes is a sudden alteration of the water chemistry, but providing you are doing the changes weekly then the tank and tap water will be sufficiently similar for this not to be an issue.

    in reply to: pygmy corydoras #349845

    Eyrie
    Participant

    “Cycling” is the process described in the link Matt provided whereby sufficently large colonies of bacteria are grown in the filter to reduce the potentially lethal ammonia produced by the fishes’ natural metabolic processes to relatively harmless nitrAte which can be removed as part of your maintenance regime.

     

    Your maintenance regime should involve a weekly test of the tank water for ammonia, nitrIte and nitrAte, followed by a water change of approximately 20-25%, although the presence of either ammonia or nitrIte in an aquarium with fish present will mean that you should do a larger change and an additional check and change each day until both are nil.

     

    At each water change it is always a good idea to clean the filter media (ie the contents of the filter box which are typically sponges or ceramic rings) in the tank water which you have just removed.  This should always be done for the first stage of the filter which is usually a floss pad as this will quickly accumulate crud which impedes the flow of water into the filter.  That flow is necessary to ensure that the bacteria living in the media get the ammonia and oxygen they need to survive.

     

    The filter media should never be replaced unless it is literally falling to pieces as you would be removing those bacteria.  The pre-filter floss can be changed every few months providing you keep it clean in between.

     

    The tank should then be topped back up using dechlorinated tap water and the easiest way to do this is to add the dechlorinator to the bucket, then fill the bucket with tap water.  The dechlorinator takes almost immediate effect and the fresh water can be added to the tank.  Failing to use dechlorinator means that the chlorine/chloramine present in tap water to make it safe to drink will kill the very bacteria you need to keep the tank healthy for fish (which brings us back to the cycle).

     

    Hope that clarifies what’s required, but just ask if there’s anything that you’re not sure about.  It’s better to learn from our mistakes (and everyone has made some!) than to make your own.

    in reply to: Substrate mistake #349790

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Very much depends on the plant species you get as not all feed through their roots but for those that do I’d recommend using fertiliser tablets.

    in reply to: Cleaning tank #349736

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Thank you for the response. I didn’t mean changing the entire filter, I mean the and not sure what it’s called, that goes inside, that has charcoal pieces in it, the part you rinse off first. Looks like a white sponge. This thing that goes in the filter unit itself. I guess it’s called a filter media? Last time I had a tank it was cotton and charcoal.    My tank is small, 15 gallons, you still recommend getting 5 more Tetras and 4 more cory catfish? I was told catfish eat the junk on the bottom of tank and that even 2 was too many. I also want to get an algae sucker. I do want more tetra though, like them. So 8 tetra, 6 catfish, 2 platies and 1 algae sucker is okay for a 15 gallon tank?   Thank you. 

     

    The media is all of the contents of the filter box.  The white sponge will be a fine-thread cotton pad used for mechanical filtration – ie it stops the crud sucked into the filter box from going any further.  This should be rinsed on a regular basis to keep it free from obstructions and allow the water to flow through to the other media, which is likely to be sponges or ceramic pieces (both of which are where most of the cycle bacteria are to be found).  It’s easy to do this as part of a weekly water change regime.

    Rudiger is correct that I missed the fact your tank is a column-style.  I’d agree on the dwarf corydoras being ideal and add that an algae eating fish isn’t necessary for keeping the tank clean (just use an algae scraper), so you should only get one if it is a fish you particularly want to keep.  The problem then is finding a species small enough for your tank’s footprint.  The commonly recommended Ancistrus species (aka bristlenoses) need a larger footprint so you would only have room for Otocinclus.

    in reply to: Cleaning tank #349720

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Welcome!

    Firstly I’d recommend cleaning on a weekly rather than a monthly basis.  This won’t take long for a 15G and will ensure that the water is always clean for the fish which will improve their health.  It also gives you a bit leeway in case you miss a week for some reason. 

    25% is a reasonable amount to change, but I’d recommend a test kit covering ammonia, nitrIte, nitrAte and pH so that you can monitor the water quality and increase the volume or frequency of changes if required.  A master test kit covering all four is cheaper than individual kits and dip strips should be avoided as these aren’t accurate enough.  If you live in a softwater area than a test kit for carbonate hardness (kh) is also useful as the water can acidify over time.

    As you’re using buckets for changes then it’s best to put the conditioner in first and then add tap water to let it take effect (almost instantaneous).

    I’d be interested to know why you want to change the filter.  If you do go down this route then just move the existing media over from the old filter to transfer the bacteria.  However if you’re thinking that the filter media needs replaced, then this should never been done unless it is falling to pieces, and even then only one part at a time.  Just give the media a quick rinse in old tank water to clean it – the water you remove at each change is ideal.

    It’s safe to put your arm in the tank, assuming you don’t have any unhealed cuts etc.  However you should always wash afterwards.  Don’t wash with soap before going in the tank however.

    Lastly I note that you refer to your stocking as “for now”.  Both the corydoras and the neon tetras are shoaling fish, so I’d increase their numbers to six and eight respectively.  Add one group first, then leave it for a couple of weeks to let the filter bacteria increase before adding the second group.

    Any questions, just ask.

    in reply to: Merry Xmas #349612

    Eyrie
    Participant

    Merry Christmas everyone!

     

    Santa has already visited me.  There was a present left outside my office door last week, which turned out to be a “Bah Humbug” hat and a “Grumpy Old Git” mug :D

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 563 total)

« Previous Entries