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KittyKat

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)
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  • in reply to: Natural Gastromyzon breeding #354564

    KittyKat
    Participant

    @Plaamoo said:
    Very cool! Do we have any Russian members to translate?

    Let me know if you’re still looking for a translation :)

    in reply to: Breeding betta #354207

    KittyKat
    Participant

    Hi, have you conditioned both fish? What size tank are you working with? It sounds like they’re not ready yet and when they’re together, she doesn’t have space to get away from him.

    At this point, you have a few options. Keep using the same tank, keep them separated, condition them and wait until the male starts building the next (can take up to two weeks).

    Alternatively, find a larger tank where she can get away from him and condition them in there, keeping a close eye on both to make sure that neither one is getting beaten up. In both cases it helps to have a fair bit of plant cover!

    All that is assuming that you do have a female and a male, of course :)

    in reply to: Supercooled fish #354179

    KittyKat
    Participant

    When I was researching my Asian themed tank, I found that a fair few of the species came from habitats that varied in temperature throughout the year with 40+°C in the summer an 10-15°C in winter (depending on location). For the species that I kept at the time, setting the heater to 18°C for winter and letting the hot summer air warm up the tank to 30°C in the summer was the most suitable as they benefited from the variations. In other words, depending on the species that you have, either option could be fine.

    in reply to: Anabantid choice for paludarium. #354172

    KittyKat
    Participant

    Trichopsis pumila is a beautiful fish which will maintain its own population in a heavily planted tank. At one point, I had a 48″ long tank where they bred regularly for about 10 years or so. I highly recommend them.

    in reply to: Red-nosed tetras #352545

    KittyKat
    Participant

    @matt, at least one of those is available at the British Library: I’ll try to have a look at it next time I’m in London.

    in reply to: Red-nosed tetras #352537

    KittyKat
    Participant

    I can give a hand with the profiles in a little bit (I’ve been trying to find those papers on and off for a few years now). Do you know if Wochenschrift für Aquarien- und Terrarienkunde had to be lodged somewhere when it was first published? I have a few friends in Berlin who have access to the University libraries.

    @knutschi, I’m breaking down the tank this week to have the flooring replaced as it’s a 500 litre, so needs to get moved somewhere else for a few days. I’ll do my best to get photos next week, but I am quite interested in figuring out for good how to ID these fish without showing a photo for reference. I’m pretty sure that my lot are a mix of H. rhodostomus and H. bleheri as they have two quite distinct patterns.

    in reply to: Micropoecilia, rareness thereof and killifish #352455

    KittyKat
    Participant

    Well, I got back last night from visiting family for a couple of days to find two 10 mm fry and one 5 mm hatchling staring at me from the tank. Does anyone know how long they take to reach 10 mm? I’m trying to work out how long ago it probably hatched. They’re now on BBS, but given that I’m going to be in and out quite often over the next week or so, how safe is it to put in a daphnia breeding group into their growing tank for a permanent supply of food? Is it ok to have the 10 mm and 5 mm fry in one growing tank for now?

     

    I imagine it takes quite some time to pick out the eggs… this seller’s policy is that they’re not interested in how many eggs are in the media, it’s sold as all of the spawning media from *some* period of time (in this case it was sold as 10 days worth, but is apparently 3 weeks worth).

    in reply to: Micropoecilia, rareness thereof and killifish #352328

    KittyKat
    Participant

    I managed to find one of the eggs when quickly digging through the spawn media earlier, before covering it with water:

    Killifish egg

    in reply to: Micropoecilia, rareness thereof and killifish #352317

    KittyKat
    Participant

    Well, the seller claims that some of the eggs were layed 2-3 weeks ago, so I can expect fry within a few days… better get those brine shrimp hatching!

    in reply to: Micropoecilia, rareness thereof and killifish #352315

    KittyKat
    Participant

    On @mikev’s recommendation, I got some ‘Innidere’… but I somehow managed to buy eggs instead of juveniles (it really was my own mistake!). Apart from feeling a bit silly, I’ve now got the spawning substrate in water in a small tank. It was collected on the 10th of December, so I’m expecting it to be a few weeks before I see any fry.

    Food wise, I have brine shrimp eggs for hatching, decapsulated brine shrimp, spirulina powder and banana, Walter and microworms. Has anyone here tried completely replacing newly hatched brine shirmp with decapsulated brine shrimp for fry? What were the results like?

     

    On the plus side, I also picked up a pair of Apistogramma commbrae at the same time, looking forward to keeping this little gem.

    in reply to: Goldfish #352161

    KittyKat
    Participant

    I would actually use the filter partially for biological filtration as well… anyway, I haven’t heard of an undergravel filter getting clogged by plants before and I’ve used them in planted tanks as well.

    in reply to: Goldfish #352153

    KittyKat
    Participant

    20 if set up and maintained correctly! If you don’t want to be changing water and cleaning filters all the time, then the tank won’t take 20, of course.

    The great thing about reverse UGs on an external filter is that the push all the crap out of the gravel and help the filter pick it up, so that you can remove it manually just by cleaning the pre-filter sponge. This helps reduce nitrates as you’d remove the waste before it rots. It’s a quite a popular setup for highly stocked tanks.

    in reply to: Goldfish #352151

    KittyKat
    Participant

    That’s not quite what I’m saying there. I’m saying that I consider that fancy goldfish need to have at 120 cm in a straight line that they can swim and 45 cm for comfortably turning around (with decor in the way) and 45 cm of vertical swimming space.

    Volumes and dimensions are two unrelated concepts when it comes to stocking. Dimensions cover swimming and territorial spaces. The most important part of the dimensions is the footprint of the tank, while height is not relevant to most fish. These are a minimum that the fish need to grow to their full adult size and not be restricted in their movements.

    Volumes are important for dosing additives such as dechlorinator and medication, for buying equipment… volumes on their own cannot be used for stocking.

    For example, a 240 litre rectangular tank of the dimensions that I specifies is great for fancy goldfish, but a 240 litre column tank would be a really bad idea because the fish would barely be able to turn around!

    As the dimensions are more important than volume, while I say that 1 fancy goldfish should have at least a 120×45×45 cm tank, I also say that 5 fancy goldfish should also have at least a 120×45×45 cm tank.

    Of course, what stocking would *actually* work also depends on what filtration and decor you have. For example, a 120×45×45 cm tank with an external filter that is rated for a 500 litre tank can probably take 15-20 adult fancy goldfish quite comfortably, assuming you keep the nitrates down. On the other hand, a 120×45×45 cm tank with an internal filter that is rated for a 250 litre tank can probably take a maximum of 10 adult fancy goldfish as the filer is unlikely to have the capacity to process the waste. I’m explicitly specifying adult goldfish because they get pretty huge if looked after well.

    On that subject, I expect an 2×+ overrated external filter connected to a reverse UG filter is probably the best filtration that you could possibly have for goldfish. And as always, I’d recommend plants to help out with keeping the nitrates down.

    in reply to: Goldfish #352149

    KittyKat
    Participant

    I recommend at least 120×45×45 cm (4×1.5×1.5 ft) for fancy goldfish or at least 180×60×60 cm (6×2×2 ft) for common goldfish. Those are the sizes of tanks that I have seen them grow to full size in. I think part of the reason is that they (especially the “normal” body shaped) need the swimming space, but also goldfish produce a lot of waste and the maintenance burden in smaller tanks is too high for the average fishkeeper.

    To be honest, I think of common goldfish more as pond fish than tank fish and if you think about pond sizes, then it’s not unreasonable to expect ponds to be considerably bigger than what I mention above.

    in reply to: hyphessobrycon amandae, temperature range #352147

    KittyKat
    Participant

    @jacco I have found what that article says to be completely true. In fact, it is apparently good for some species to have a “winter” period every year.

     

    @matt is it possible for you to add a recommended temperature for discus?

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