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MatsP

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 115 total)
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  • in reply to: Eheim 2217 #342889

    MatsP
    Participant

    Have you checked the impeller? I’ve heard of the shaft of the impeller assembly being broken.


    Mats

    in reply to: Eheim 2217 #342870

    MatsP
    Participant

    Did this solve itself? Mine is definitely quiet.


    Mats

    in reply to: T5 Lighting Question #342869

    MatsP
    Participant

    Here’s a good site (in finnish, but it doesn’t matter to this particular page)
    http://saurama.aqua-web.org/index.htm

    This shows some of the different colours of fluorescent tubes…


    Mats

    in reply to: Rosy Loach #341682

    MatsP
    Participant

    For reference: To check if a name is valid [it won’t tell you if the species is what you think it is!], I use Catalog of Fishes:
    http://researcharchive.calacademy.org/rese…fishcatmain.asp


    Mats


    MatsP
    Participant

    I saw a couple of mentions of this on Facebook, but the consensus was that the publisher of the article is quite a few levels below the Nature and Science publications for reputation.


    Mats

    in reply to: Water Changes #341508

    MatsP
    Participant

    QUOTE (Bluedave @ Mar 4 2011, 06:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    I’m no chemist but I think it’s to do with an increase in H+ ions as temperature increases – pH is a measure of H+ ions.

    I wouldn’t think that’s generally true. But some weak acids (and alkalines/bases) may indeed be temperature dependant. And of course, the reagent/meter may be temperature sensitive…

    I think CO2 is one of those “weak acids”.


    Mats

    in reply to: Sf Survey #341491

    MatsP
    Participant

    Ah, my speed-reading skills not up to the job again…

    in reply to: Sf Survey #341487

    MatsP
    Participant

    I take it that the last question is “how many fishkeeping websites”, rather than the total sum of searching, mail, comedy, video & photo sites, computer programming, motorcycling, social networking, etc.

    in reply to: Filters For New Tank #341470

    MatsP
    Participant

    Two Eheim Classic 2217 filters with sponge media costs less than a Eheim 2080 without filter meda. The FX5 online prices range from £160-240, which is a bit less to a bit more than the Eheim – and comes with media.

    I use one 2217 on a 270 liter tank, and a ProII 2028 on my other 270 liter tank.


    Mats

    in reply to: Filters For New Tank #341466

    MatsP
    Participant

    2 x Eheim Classic 2217 would be a great combination of good filtration and reasonable value for money. I love the Eheim classics because they are SO simple (I have three of them at the moment). And it’s the ONLY filter I know of that is guaranteed to not “bypass” the filter media, as the water comes in at the bottom of the filter, and goes out the top.

    Just make sure, if you are buying online, that you get the “plus” pack, which comes complete with sponges and a set of quick-connectors so you can disconnect the filter for cleaning.

    (On a 500 liter tank, you probably don’t want a single filter – but if you must go with one filter only, the Fluval FX5 are supposedly very good).


    Mats

    in reply to: Mts #341423

    MatsP
    Participant

    Bonus indeed.


    Mats

    in reply to: Cardinal Tetras #341406

    MatsP
    Participant

    Tetras like the Cardinal Tetra are “the more the merrier” – a larger group is definitely better.

    Somehow, either your measurements of the tank dimension or volume is wrong, as I get about 125 liter from that size tank.

    The standard guideline says 1cm fish per 2 liter of water (or 1inch per gallon). 125/2 = 60 cm. Size of a fully grown cardinal is about 3cm, so about 20 cardinals if that’s the only thing in the tank.

    We can also calculate 1inch per 12 square inches of surface area. Your tank is 24 x 15 inches -> 360 square inches -> 30 inches of fish. 1 cardinal = 1.25 inches => 24 fish.

    If I enter 25 cardinals into http://aqadvisor.com, it says 92% stocked, and need 24% water changes each week.

    Of course, this is just a few of many guidelines for stocking. If your filtration and water change regime can make sure the nitrate and other nitrogenous waste is kept under control, then a bigger shoal could very well work.

    None of the above takes into account your present stock – that clearly has to be done, but since you are a bit vague on the numbers, I can’t say for sure how much needs to be deducted – I just wanted to show that there are many different ways to come up with a number, and the result varies a bit. The ideal method is actually to measure the nitrogenous waste, and adjust stocking/water changes accordingingly.


    Mats

    in reply to: Water Changes #341276

    MatsP
    Participant

    It probably depends on lots of factors.

    There are people who say “don’t use hot water in your tank”. They claim that the water will contain copper – which may be true if you live in really soft water areas. In hard water areas, it’s unlikely to make much of a difference.

    I do use hot water from the kitchen tap, have done [or the bathroom].

    I also use RO water – for a lot of my tanks, it’s only RO water which is heated with an aquarium heater…


    Mats

    in reply to: Question Of The Week…. #341266

    MatsP
    Participant

    I don’t know about any real documentation, but many cory are often hard to breed in the wild-caught population, but the same species in F1 or F2 (or some other Fn) are relatively easy to breed.

    I think this is some evidence of the “only those suitable/adapted survive”, and there is, presumably, some genetic variability as to whether they tolerate/breed in different water conditions.


    Mats

    in reply to: Question Of The Week…. #341253

    MatsP
    Participant

    QUOTE (Colin @ Feb 20 2011, 12:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    In most cases fish gradually adapt to changing conditions like the acidification of an aquarium through time. This happens to many people who do not test their water and in softwater areas the pH can sneak down to 4 or 5 with no obvious affect on the fish… until they try to add a new fish which quickly dies!

    After having been told MANY times that low pH is bad for fish, I was absolutely convinced my (then brand new) pH meter was broken/miscalibrated/plain wrong when my pH came up as 4.0 – all the fish were perfectly happy and absolutely not “suffering”. I didn’t, at that time, try to add any new fish. But it’s clear that acidic water, to many fish, aren’t a huge problem.

    I spent the next two hours checking my pH meter, but it did seem to be as near correct as I could make out – tap water around 7.5, KH buffer at 8.2, vinegar at 2.2, etc.


    Mats

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 115 total)

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