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FishGoy

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  • in reply to: My new 20 gallon – starting off! #388790

    FishGoy
    Participant

    An hour of indirect sunlight won’t set off an algae bloom, but it’s something to be aware of if such a problem does arise. Maybe throw the tank on a wheeled surface so you can reposition it if needed.

     

    I don’t notice a difference in algae growth from my black-backed (and sides) tanks. I wouldn’t worry about algae too much in a brand new tank. Make adjustments as needed as you progress. Remember to spend some quality time viewing and enjoying your tank each day, and algae will never sneak up on you.

     

    -Fish Goy

     

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by FishGoy.
    in reply to: 10 gallon Nano tank #388788

    FishGoy
    Participant

    Welcome to the hobby,

     

    A ten-gallon tank is a great place to start. I could go on for paragraphs about what to do and what not to do, these things you will find in research and experience, so research as much as you can stand. I spend months researching before I even fill my new tanks with water, let alone flora and fauna. Look at specimens that interest you. Read about their ideal conditions. Is it feasible for you to keep fish at these conditions?

    I have very low PH water where I live and keeping fish that need higher levels can be more trouble than it’s worth at times. A great place to get an idea of your water parameters is to find your town’s water analysis, usually found through the municipal website. Although testing will always prove more accurate, you can get an idea of what range of different parameters you will have, and you can suit your first aquaria purchases within this, rather than struggling to do the reverse. (if you’re on well water, you can find basic water test kits for pretty cheap)

    For example, you’re interested in raising shrimp. Most shrimp are very intolerant to even low amounts of copper. Does your water have high copper? Probably not, but it’s good to have an idea of your water parameters prior to acquiring your livestock, for their sake and your wallet’s sake.

    Hope this helps you on your journey. In the end, just do what feels right, you will build experience in success and failure that you will make use of time and time again. Never be afraid to try something new.

     

    -Fishgoy

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