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johnpeten

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 252 total)
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  • in reply to: Plec Help #319069

    johnpeten
    Participant

    Provide your pleco with a varied and nutritious diet. You can for instance combine algae based prepared foods with fresh zucchini, cucumbers, kale etc. Green peas are good for the metabolism. It is also important to always include wood in the set up when you decorate the aquarium, because the Royal pleco needs to chew on wood to stay healthy. In the wild, the Royal pleco probably ingests tiny animals while grazing algae and it can therefore appreciate occasional servings of meaty food in the aquarium. These servings must be small and infrequent.
    A quote from an internet site.

    My Pleco lives in a tank with lots of sunshine and therefore plenty of alga to eat. He also eats normal FD flake. He also eats slices of cucumber. During the night he can consume several slices.
    His only activity is from dusk to dawn.

    The recommended pH-value when keeping Royal pleco is 6.5-7.5. The temperature should be in the 22-30 degrees C (72-86 degrees F) range. The water should ideally be fairly soft, from 2 dH to 15 dH.

    in reply to: Red Eared Slider #318344

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Jul 27 2010, 12:49 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Interesting and very attractive critter, John. here if you haven’t seen it already.


    Thanks Matt, that is a very comprehensive and interesting study. The Tortoise is now in an enclosure in my garden. Luckily my assistant has learned to be a very good carpenter. If it settles we will keep it for while, if not we will release it in the woods.
    It is getting like a Zoo here. My four baby Parrots have been weaned and fledged and are now growing into very robust and amusing teenagers. Last Friday I was given an 8 weekold Squirrel (Ardilla) to raise. An eyedropper with puppy formula (goats milk) This is going well so far but I have to spend a lot of time with a young squirrel clinging to my person. 10 days ago I refused a baby alligator, this would have been too much.
    John

    Attached files

    in reply to: Red Eared Slider #318334

    johnpeten
    Participant

    I have stumbled onto the identity of this turtle. An enterprising chap conducting nature tours of Belize and Guatemala included this turtle in his photo collection and included a picture of the plastron or I would never have recognised it. It is a wood turtle and not a freshwater turtle which made the initial search fruitless. It is the Furrowed Wood Turtle, Rhinoclemmys areolata. It lives in the woods, sometimes near marshy areas but is principally a terrestial turtle. If I was more observant I would have noticed the domed shell typical of a tortoise.
    Lucky for the tortoise I found out who he was early and saved him from spending the night half immersed in water.

    in reply to: Mikrogeophagus Altispinosus – Bolivian Rams #318144

    johnpeten
    Participant

    http://www.cichlid-forum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=142702

    From my Cichlid database your situation, as David said is great, including companions.
    The above link gives some ideas about sexing.
    A very attractive fish.

    in reply to: The Mysterious Margaritifer #318123

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ Jun 16 2010, 12:44 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Fascinating stuff John, and I’d be more than happy to try and decipher the merisitic data for you.


    Hi res image attached.

    Attached files

    in reply to: Just A Few Pics From My Hols #317884

    johnpeten
    Participant

    It has been more than 40 years since I was in Gran Canaria. I think my Hotel was near La Playa de Tauro. I did not speak Spanish but I found my Geman was more effective than English.
    At a fiesta at a farm for raising fighting bulls I drank too much tequila and volunteered to enter the bullring. I preformed very well to great applause until the young bull got smart and instead of passing slammed on the brakes and flipped me on my back. The applause was then even louder.
    I also went to the top of the mountain above the clouds, great views. I had the best paella cooked while on a shark fishing expedition.
    Las Palmas was a quiet sleepy town but I guess a lot has changed.
    I found an old snap with a small shark that I caught.

    Attached files

    in reply to: Pics From Our Mis-adventures On Saturday #317863

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (Malti @ May 19 2010, 05:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    John do the locals use cormorants to fish there?

    No Karlos, they are not that smart. I believe the Chinese used to use this method by tieing cords around their necks to stop the birds swallowing the fish.

    Attached files

    in reply to: Big Storm #317849

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ May 17 2010, 01:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    How was the water on the lake in the middle of that John? /ohmy.gif” style=”vertical-align:middle” emoid=”:o” border=”0″ alt=”ohmy.gif” />
    in reply to: Big Storm #317848

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (Bluedave @ May 17 2010, 01:44 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Sorry to hear that John, hopefully you’ll be up and running again soon. Might be worth investing in a UPS for the new computer!


    I have a UPS, a must have here as we have frequent power outages. It didn’t protect me which is a bit of a mystery.
    I have now figured out the Vista system on my new computer and I am beginning to like it.
    The New computer is a small box that is a little wizard. It has 290 GB HD and 2 GB memory it has slots for all types of memory cards plus 6 USB ports. It came with a LCD monitor, speakers, keyboard etc for £300. It has several other connections which I haven’t figured yet.

    Attached files

    in reply to: More Pics From The Trip, Last Sunday #317825

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (coelacanth @ May 12 2010, 06:30 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    The only genuine recipe I’ve read necessitated soaking the creature in lye before cooking to make it edible.


    Thanks but I won’t tell the locals about this. They are very familiar with Lye; they use it to shuck the Maize before it is milled into pasta for tortillas. The Lye also does something to the Maize to make it more nutritious. Very strange but the Ancient Maya new about this 2,000 years ago.

    I am amazed what these people knew and also other ancient civilisations. This makes me believe that they were visited by ETs.

    in reply to: More Pics From The Trip, Last Sunday #317822

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (Bluedave @ May 12 2010, 03:41 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    They look to be collecting freshwater? But wouldn’t get much out of that small contraption!


    These people are squatters who have established themselves in a remote area (very common here). I think that you have got it right. They have built a sump for collecting water. It is obviously a permanent “structure” and they were probably improving it.

    This whole area(several square miles) on the Southern shore of the Western extension of the Lake was bought, many years ago by one of our Military Presidents and has been left forgotten and undeveloped ever since. From the Sat photo it appears that Campesinos (Peasant squatters) have settled and made Milpas (small holdings)

    Attached files

    in reply to: More Pics From The Trip, Last Sunday #317821

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (coelacanth @ May 12 2010, 02:55 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Top picture is of black-bellied whistling ducks.


    Wow, many thanks, that is a very interesting bird. Dendrocygna autumnalis. Found in the Southern US through to Central America. In all my years here this is the first sighting. They probably only survive because they live in a remote inaccessible part of the Lake.
    This was also my first sighting of Pelicans who survive here for the same reason.
    The only waterfowl that are common all over the Lake are Cormorants, which probably don’t taste very good.

    in reply to: Fishing Trip, Using Cast Nets. #317816

    johnpeten
    Participant

    Some more photos of the Sunday collection.

    Attached files

    in reply to: Fishing Trip, Using Cast Nets. #317815

    johnpeten
    Participant

    QUOTE (Matt @ May 11 2010, 05:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
    Fantastic work John – were the mollies in abundance?


    We only caught the large male and a smaller male. The boys were only drawing my attention to the cichlids that we caught so that I could identify them. The others they simply dumped into the holding buckets. I don’t know therefore where we caught them. We were working along the entire shore of the Western extension of the Lake. We also fished in the basin in front of San Benito. On our way home we also fished the sheltered southern peninsular before we crossed the main Lake.
    From my previous studies of other peoples activities I would expect to find the Mollies and some other non cichlids in the basin between San Benito and Flores Island. We will fish this area again next Saturday on our way to the Lagoon at the end of the Southern Extension of the Lake.

    Attached files

    in reply to: Fishing Trip, Using Cast Nets. #317801

    johnpeten
    Participant

    Male P. petenensis mollies have gray-turquoise to gray-green bodies . The caudal (tail) is orange in the center and sky blue or turquoise above and below. The caudal has a short black sword on the lower margin. The dorsal is immense and has rows of black bars and an orange border.

    Putting it politely a great deal of discussion has taken place concerning the Poecilia petenensis or/and the kykesis. Quite frankly a great deal of nonsense has been put about.
    SAC lists them as separate species. Above is the most sensible description that I have read. Some people have even said that the Peten Molly does not have a sailfin. Actually the female doesn’t.
    Anyway, I can now say that I have found a male P. petenensis in Lake Peten and the above description is correct and have the photos to prove it.
    Here is a closeup of the caudal fin showing the short black “swordtail”.
    The tank housing this molly could be cleaner and I hopefully will be able take better photos.

    Fred. N. Poeser
    Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Department of Ichthyology, Zoological Museum, University of Amsterdam
    Fred went through the differences between kykesis and petenensis in great detail and his final comment was that petenensis is endemic to Lake Peten.

    Attached files

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