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Copella meinkeni ZARSKE & GÉRY, 2006

Spotted Splashing Tetra

March 6th, 2013 — 3:27pm

This species has been widely referred to as the congener C. nattereri in aquarium literature both prior to and post-publication of its official description in 2006.

The two can be told apart quite easily by the fact that C. nattereri possesses a dark lateral stripe while C. meinkeni does not.

C. meinkeni can be distinguished from all congeners by the followi…

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Copella nattereri (STEINDACHNER, 1876)

March 6th, 2013 — 11:54am

This species is sometimes traded as C. sp. ‘red line’, ‘spotted tetra’ or as its congener C. nigrofasciata.

In the past it’s name was also widely applied to the fish now identified as C. callolepis and C. meinkeni, and this misidentification continues to an extent although the two are easily-distinguished by the fact that C. nattereri is the only one of the three possessing a dark lateral stripe on each side of the body.

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Copeina guttata (STEINDACHNER, 1876)

Red-spotted Tetra

March 4th, 2013 — 2:20pm

Known from the middle and upper Amazon river basins in Brazil, Peru, Ecuador and Colombia.

Type locality is ‘Amazon River at Obidos, Cudajas, and Tabatinga; Rio Negro, Brazil.’

It apparently practises an interesting reproductive strategy in which the eggs are deposited in a shallow depression excavated from the substrate and guarded by the male.

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Leporinus friderici BLOCH, 1794

Threespot Leporinus

March 4th, 2013 — 10:42am

This species was described from Suriname but no specific locality was given.

It’s currently accepted to occur throughout much of the Amazon river system in Brazil, Peru and Bolivia with additional records from coastal drainages of Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana plus the island of Trinidad (Trinidad and Tobago).

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Leporellus vittatus (VALENCIENNES, 1850)

February 27th, 2013 — 12:02pm

Type locality is given simply as ‘Amazon River, Brazil’ and according to current thinking this species has a huge natural range encompassing the Amazon River system in Brazil and Peru plus the Paraná-Paraguay drainage in southern Brazil and Paraguay and rio São Francisco basin in southern Brazil.

Specimens in our images were collected fro…

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Brachyplatystoma vaillantii (VALENCIENNES, 1840)

May 6th, 2012 — 6:44pm

This rich feeding ground is exploited until the sea water returns, at which point the catfishes begin to migrate upstream in massive numbers, moving up the Amazon and its tributaries. Sexually mature individuals are not normally recorded during these events so they’re thought related to feeding and dispersal rather than spawning. The fish are subject to intensive capture by commercial and artisanal fishing operations during this upstream movement.

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Brachyplatystoma capapretum LUNDBERG & AKAMA, 2005

May 6th, 2012 — 2:28pm

This species can be told apart from the very similar-looking congener B. filamentosum by its smaller adult size (B. filamentosum can grow to almost 3 m in length), shorter maxillary barbels (never extending beyond base of adipose fin (vs. extending beyond base of adipose fin), moderately-forked with lobes of equal size (vs. deeply-forked caudal fin with upper lobe usually longer than the lower) and body col…

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Brachyplatystoma rousseauxii (CASTELNAU, 1855)

Dourada

May 6th, 2012 — 1:05pm

Study of B. rousseauxii has revealed that sexually mature adults are found only in the western Amazon, with no mature individual ever recorded east of Manaus despite the intensive commercial fishery operating there. The total distance covered by some populations during migration from the delta was as much as 5500 km, making it the longest known in any freshwater fish species.

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Brachyplatystoma platynemum BOULENGER, 1898

Slobbering Catfish

May 4th, 2012 — 4:35pm

Found in a number of habitat-types, though rarely in smaller tributaries, generally preferring deeper, flowing channels through which it travels for considerable distances at certain times of year. Like other large, migratory pimelodids these movements are typically associated with nutrient-rich, white water drainages rather than nutrient-poor black waters.

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Ageneiosus ucayalensis CASTELNAU, 1855

March 13th, 2012 — 1:26pm

Apparently this species is polymorphic with body patterning varying significantly depending on locality. Individuals collected from black water habitats tend to be noticeably darker in overall colouration, for example, with this being particularly evident among populations from the Guiana Shield.

The genus Ageneiosus was at one point classified in…

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