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Garra notata (BLYTH, 1860)

October 20th, 2014 — 4:10pm

G. notata is one of a number of congeners to lack both a transverse groove and a proboscis on the snout. It also possesses 33-34 lateral line scales and a series of dark spots at the base of the dorsal-fin rays, and lacks scales on the lower portion of the body and abdomen.

The genus Garra is a particularly enigmatic grouping with new taxa…

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Scleropages inscriptus ROBERTS, 2012

May 17th, 2014 — 1:06pm

This species’ distribution is unclear although individuals from the aquarium trade are said to have been collected in the Tenasserim river basin in Tananthayi Region, southern Myanmar.

Type locality is ‘supposedly from Tananthayi district, Tananthayi River basin, obtained dead from aquarium fish vendor at Meik’.

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Channa lucius (CUVIER, 1831)

Forest Snakehead

July 10th, 2013 — 4:05pm

Prefers a dimly-lit aquarium with plenty of cover in the form of live plants, driftwood branches, terracotta pipes, plant pots, etc., arranged to form a network of nooks, crannies, and shaded spots.

Surface vegetation such as Ceratopteris spp. is also appreciated and makes the fish less inclined to conceal themselves.

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Homalopteroides modestus (VINCIGUERRA, 1890)

January 2nd, 2013 — 2:25pm

Homalopteroides spp. are specialised micropredators feeding on small crustaceans, insect larvae and other invertebrates.

In captivity some sinking dried foods may be accepted but regular meals of live or frozen Daphnia, Artemia, bloodworm, etc., are essential for the maintenance of good health.

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Brachydanio sp. 'hikari'

Hikari 'Danio'

March 13th, 2012 — 1:24pm

This potentially-undescribed species first became available in 2002, and males and females were marketed as ‘Danio sp. hikari yellow’ and ‘D. sp. hikari blue’, respectively. Subsequent DNA testing in the United States revealed them to be the same species and genetically distinct from the very similar B. kerri. It can be told apart as the central body (P) stripe always extends into the caudal fin whereas in B. kerri it terminates at the caudal peduncle. Only a single population of B. kerri was sampled in the stu…

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Badis ruber SCHREITM√úLLER, 1923

Burmese Badis

March 13th, 2012 — 1:22pm

B. ruber is among the better known Badis species in the aquarium hobby with trade names including ‘Burmese badis’ and ‘red badis’.

It was referred as Badis badis burmicanus for a number of years and will be seen labelled as such in older literature.

Among congeners it is most easily confused with…

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